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Offline Xpect8r

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Re: Altitude sickness - I'm surprised there aren't more complaints
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2013, 03:30:02 AM »
The map was checked/updated? this summer at the dealer.
I remember being pretty pissed that I couldn't clear the wrench icon after changing the oil.
What a rip-off

Maybe I should consider a different chain&sprocket set

I need low end grunt before I get back into this:


Offline AvgBear

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Re: Altitude sickness - I'm surprised there aren't more complaints
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2013, 07:32:27 PM »
If all systems on your Tiger are functioning properly?, I'd imagine it would run fine at altitude -- but, with less power.
Back in the day of carburetors, smaller jets had to be put in for higher altitude -- less oxygen meant less gasoline to be mixed with.
Nowadays, with fuel injection, sensors take care of telling the F.I. computer how much to mix -- automatically.

Interestingly, a few weeks ago I was having a conversation with a guy who collects/restores/sells Honda Trail 90s (CT90s) and I mentioned my friend from years ago who rode his to and from his job -- I said: "They'll go about 55 mph on the highway."
He said: "Not here at 6,000 ft. -- tops only 45 ~ 50 mph."
(less oxygen = less power)
"Working on a motorcycle, working well, caring, is to become part of a process, to achieve an inner peace of mind.
The motorcycle is primarily a mental phenomenon."
Robert M. Pirsig

Offline AvgBear

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Re: Altitude sickness - I'm surprised there aren't more complaints
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2013, 07:43:14 PM »
*Originally Posted by Xpect8r [+]
I remember being pretty pissed that I couldn't clear the wrench icon after changing the oil.
What a rip-off
I've had my 'icon' removed several times - by different dealers -- I've yet to be charged for it...
(I happen to think that it's a good idea to see a dealer's service dept. once-in-a-while -- just-in-case: service bulletin, up-date, re-call, latest info., etc.)

*Originally Posted by Xpect8r [+]
Maybe I should consider a different chain&sprocket set
I concur -- I've always felt that if I were to take my Tiger800 off-road?, I'd want much lower gearing. I think it's really beneficial to have all the low speed ability and control that low gearing provides.
And, given the speed capabilities of the Tiger800, a decent-enough road speed can probably still be achieved (if necessary?).
"Working on a motorcycle, working well, caring, is to become part of a process, to achieve an inner peace of mind.
The motorcycle is primarily a mental phenomenon."
Robert M. Pirsig

Offline OzBooster

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Re: Altitude sickness - I'm surprised there aren't more complaints
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2013, 09:28:32 PM »
You may want to get it checked on a dyno, you may have a lean/rich condition in normal running that is more obvious at altitude


Offline Xpect8r

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Re: Altitude sickness
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2013, 12:39:01 AM »
Well...
I sort of felt bad, complaining about one of the best bikes I ever owned. So, I wanted to change the title of this thread from "Altitude sickness - I'm surprised there aren't more complaints" to simply "Altitude sickness".

Unfortunately, all of the helpful replies quote the original thread title. Oh well.

I can't complain but sometimes I still do - Joe Walsh

I rode this smooth running machine across Great Plains, cruising over some stretches at speeds over 90mph. Then, without any modifications, I rode it up several jeep trails in Colorado. It took my daughter and me above tree line more than once and to the Continental Divide. A month later, I was tearing around southwest Wisconsin, faster than my buddies on FJRs on all but the longest, straightest roads.
The only problem is off idle power around 11,000'

So thank you for not replying with simply "Quit yer bitch'n"

Any sprocket & chain advice is appreciated. (and... I'll look for a thread on that)

Thanks for the help!
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 12:43:16 AM by Xpect8r »

Offline Greg

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Re: Altitude sickness
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2013, 06:55:00 AM »
Over the pond, don't your bikes have a different emissions canister or something...  :027:

Just wondering if that had anything to do with it...  :084:

We don't have them in Europe...

Greg
It's a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you're ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.
Hugh Laurie

Offline AvgBear

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Re: Altitude sickness
« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2013, 05:59:25 PM »
Yes, the canister collects the gasoline fumes from the gas tank and, on command from the 'computer', allows them to be sucked into the intakes at the appropriate times.
I haven't studied the system -- but, if extra gas fumes were introduced at inappropriate times (say above 10,000 feet) it could have a detrimental effect on slow speed operation..?  :027:
"Working on a motorcycle, working well, caring, is to become part of a process, to achieve an inner peace of mind.
The motorcycle is primarily a mental phenomenon."
Robert M. Pirsig

Offline berger

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Re: Altitude sickness
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2013, 06:43:48 PM »
*Originally Posted by Greg [+]
Over the pond, don't your bikes have a different emissions canister or something...  :027:

Just wondering if that had anything to do with it...  :084:

We don't have them in Europe...

Greg

Just the Yanks. We do not have the Charcoal canister in Canada, which is why the centre stands for Euro/Canadian models are different than the American version.
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2014 Tiger 800XC ABS
2007 Ural Patrol 2wd

Offline Nick_of_time

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Re: Altitude sickness
« Reply #18 on: February 07, 2014, 12:49:23 AM »
Sorry I didn't see this sooner. Had the same problem here in California.  I'd ride from sea level up to the Sierras in a day and at altitudes over 7500 ft it would just refuse to idle.  Started happening just after I had a new map put on a year or so ago. The service people had a good idea though. At their suggestion  I "fixed' the problem by taking it up to 5000 ft and removing the negative battery cable for more than 10 minutes. This resets all of the "adapting" that the adaptive technology had done. The theory was that the new map wasn't capable of "adapting" from sea level to 7500 ft.  But maybe it would be able to adapt up above and below the new baseline at 5000 ft. That worked -  Now it idles everywhere.

-Nick


Offline Mike31

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Re: Altitude sickness
« Reply #19 on: February 07, 2014, 09:45:05 AM »
 :123:god post

 


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