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Offline Seniorharold

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Fork Springs.
« on: May 28, 2011, 02:13:29 PM »
As far as I can remember, I haven't seen anything on the lack of fork spring adjustment in the posts. Like many of us, I tested the 800 and wanted one and am happy to report that I pick up mine on Wednesday (Venom Road). I guess that non adjustable forks are part of the costing but I can't see how such forks can suit all the variations of rider weight and types of riding style. Those of us who have had a 1050 (or the rich who have both!) will know how the big brother was badly under sprung at the front, even at max preload. (I had mine fitted with hlins to combat that) At least, however, we were given adjustment to play with.
Have Triumph done something wonderous with the fork on the 800 that it doesn't need adjustment? I'm also cynical enough to think that many people who claim to be able to detect "improvements" with a"click" here and a "click" there don't really exist.
Any thoughts from those who have put in the miles?

Offline jallen

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2011, 02:43:39 PM »
I have to admit that I was slightly concerned when I first heard about the lack of adjustability. 1300 miles later I have pretty much forgotten about it, suits me fine although I am not particularly light :) 

I have owned plenty of superbikes and sports tourers with fully adjustable suspension and could detect a difference when the adjustment was more than a few clicks one way or the other but only really adjusted them once. That said I still think that only Ohlins and other high quality suspension units give you much in the way of adjustment.

Have Triumph done anything wonderous? No not really just taken a reasonable guess, much like the default suspension settings on most bikes to suit most people most of the time.

Offline Boxmonkey

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2011, 07:38:20 PM »
I agree with jallen. I was also worried with the non adjustable fork, but the demo worked well for me, so I took the plunge. I also am not light, 265lbs. I only have 205 miles, but it is working fine for me.

Offline Seniorharold

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2011, 06:04:30 PM »
Thanks to both of you. I'm reassured. Actually I called in at the dealers today in advance of my collection on Wednesday and sat on it. Looking particularly at this question, the fork does seem to be much firmer than the 1050 and the salesman, who was present at the launch, confirmed the road version is firmer that the XC. How far away is Wednesday? and do I run it in as per the "book" or with that interesting method that says "cane it"? But that's another thread!

Offline gipsvar

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2011, 07:33:48 PM »
This article from Sonic springs (US springs for motorcycle) can help:

"Setting Sag on Street Bikes
Setting the amount of sag your suspension has is an important step in optimizing both the handling and the comfort of your bike. Unfortunately, there's a lot of confusion on the subject, so we'll try to keep things as simple and straightforward as possible. First off, what is sag, and why does it matter? Sag is the amount of suspension travel that is used up with the bike sitting still, with the rider and any luggage or passenger on the bike also. It matters because it governs how much of the available travel is used for bump absorption and how much extension is there to "fill in" as the bike travels over dips or pot holes. Having the right balance between these two is critical to performance, safety and comfort.
To measure sag you'll need at least one assistant, preferably two. First, measure the exposed section of the fork tube with the suspension fully extended. For standard forks this is the distance between the top of the wiper or dust seal and the bottom of the lower triple clamp. For inverted forks, measure from the seal to a convenient point on the tube. Write this number down. Next take the bike off the stands (This is important!! Do not measure sag with the bike on the stands!) and get on it. If you have a second assistant have him hold the bike upright while you assume your normal riding position. If not, hold the bike as vertical as possible with one foot, keeping as much weight as you can on the bike. Have the first assistant push down on the front end a little and slooooowly let the bike rise until it stops. Measure the exposed fork tube length and write it down. Now have him extend the front a bit and let it settle back down slooooowly. Measure the exposed fork tube length and write it down. Now average last two numbers and subtract them from the first, this is your total sag. An example:
First measurement: 5 " Second measurement:   4" Third measurement:   4 "
Average of second and third is 4 ", subtracting that from 5 " gives 1 ", or approximately 32mm of total sag.
This is right in our recommended range of 30-35mm for street bikes.
If you have too much sag, add some pre-load. If too little, take some pre-load out."

Today he has not springs for Tiger 800
gipsvar
 
Honda CB 500 S
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Triumph Tiger 800 ABS white 'THE BEST"

Offline blacktiger

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2011, 02:51:22 PM »
Reading the above post I have to point out that if you go by that suggestion of 30~35mm on a Tiger you'll end up with your suspension too stiff because the Tiger has 2" more travel than the bike they're using in the article.
As an approximation your static sag with rider on board should be about 1/3 of total travel available. So for the T800 with 177mm(book) travel the sag should be about 60mm and for the XC with 225mm it should be around 75mm.
Black '13 Tiger800XC. The other British Land Rover. 19000 miles and counting.
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Offline gipsvar

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2011, 03:49:13 PM »
About Sonic Springs they say :
"our recommended range of 30-35mm for street bikes"
But Tiger 800 isn't a street bike and the XC is even less. I'm asking to Sonic Springs his opinion about 800 and 800 XC.
gipsvar
Honda CB 500 S
Honda VFR 800 ABS
Suzuki VStrom 650
BMW 1200 GS pack 2
Triumph Tiger 800 ABS white 'THE BEST"

Offline halfast3

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2011, 09:43:48 PM »
I go with a percentage instead of an actual number to be applied across the board: 25% for sport  bikes and ~35 - 40% for a plush ride on a bike like the Tiger.
Why do I get strange looks when I say my hobby is "curves"?

Offline gipsvar

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Re: Fork Springs.
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2011, 04:48:42 PM »
Response from Sonic Springs about SAG for 800 and 800 XC:
"Jean-Pierre,
A lot depends on spring rate and intended usage, but I'd start with
50-52mm on the regular Tiger and 62-65mm on the XC.
Rich"
gipsvar
Honda CB 500 S
Honda VFR 800 ABS
Suzuki VStrom 650
BMW 1200 GS pack 2
Triumph Tiger 800 ABS white 'THE BEST"

 


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