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Offline dezert

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  • Bike: Tiger 800 ABS 11
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Tiger 800 Roadie - fork + rear shock rebuild
« on: June 14, 2017, 09:36:42 PM »
Hello

I recently acquired a Tiger 2011 road model, bone stock besided Arrow exhaust. Didn't like the suspension from the start. After reading some posts here I decided to act. First were the forks - I have disassembled them and inspected stock shim stacks. Based on some suggestions tha the compression is too much and rebound too weak I have reconfigured the stack by moving one face shim from compression to rebound (they happen to be same size, and in fact same shim stack on both ends, see description below). Assebled and used 5W oil.
The for feels slightly better, but the test was rather short, so time will tell more. Perhaps I will make somo more reshimming or even drill a bypass hole.

Now for the shock. I have read that the stock unit is an emulsion shock with way too much of both rebound and compression. It is indeed quite harsh. So I started by dissassembly - and at this point I got confused. I drilled a hole in top part of the shock to release the pressure. removed the cap and pulled out the shaft. There was indeed not much oil inside, but what really made me wonder is that in the top part of the shock body thare is a floating piston!  :435:

Is anyone here fimiliar with the details of this shock, is it really emulsion or is it an Internal Floating Piston design? Pressure of nitrogen? Best way to assemble the shock with right levels of oil?

For others benefit here is what I so far measured up:
Front fork springs 0,55kg/mm
Rear shock spring 9,75kg/mm

Fork shim stacks stock:
Compression (on the bottom):
17x0,15 x4 (x3 in rebuilt, current version)
16x0,15
15x0,15
14x0,15
8,25x0,25 - base
11,4x0,45

Rebound (rod end):
17x0,15 x4 (x5 in rebuilt, current version)
16x0,15
15x0,15
14x0,15
8,25x0,25 - base
11,4x0,45 x7

EDIT / Update:
Rear shock stock shim stack:

Compression
34x0,2 x6 (will remove one)
32x0,2 x3 (will remove one)
30x0,3
15,5x0,2
18x0,3
25,3x0,6

Bleed (compression) 0,7-0,75mm - had no needles inbetween to measure exactly (will increase to 0,8 as I happen to have such drillbit)

Rebound
31x0,3 x7 (will remove two)
15,5x0,2
18x0,3
25,3x0,6 x3

Hope others can benefit from it :)

Regards, Szymon
« Last Edit: June 24, 2017, 04:59:23 PM by dezert »

Offline mcinlb

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Re: Tiger 800 Roadie - fork + rear shock rebuild
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2017, 08:57:20 AM »
Hi, Szymon, some interesting work you are doing with  your suspension, here is a note from one of our suspension experts in the uk about Tiger front and rear units, may be of some help.

Offline dezert

  • Tiger Cub
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  • Bike: Tiger 800 ABS 11
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Re: Tiger 800 Roadie - fork + rear shock rebuild
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2017, 10:11:20 AM »
Thanks mcinlb - I am fimiliar with this sheet - it was a lot of help to me to begin the work. Anyway it does not mention about the design of the shock.
On a side note, with 65kg i Get quite reasonable sags at:
Front - 43mm -25%
Rear preload fully out  - 48mm - 27%
Rear fully in - 24mm - 14% - I ride a lot with pillion and hard cases so that should cover for it

Offline dezert

  • Tiger Cub
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  • Posts: 3
  • Bike: Tiger 800 ABS 11
  • Location: Vsters,Sweden
Re: Tiger 800 Roadie - fork + rear shock rebuild
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2017, 07:49:44 AM »
Job is done, both front and rear were modified as I explained earlier. Did some short test ride solo and the result is good. The change is not dramatic, and I think this is a good sign, especially that I plan to do some longer trips 2-up with bunch of luggage. The suspension is more compliant now, but havent lost good manners on fast corners. I will come back with some more feedback when I ride more.

PS. shock was charged with nitrogen to 175PSI - it did hold the pressure overnight so I will check it again after some time, maybe in the coming winter.

 


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