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Offline Pailton

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Lowering Suspension
« on: September 07, 2017, 03:27:42 AM »
Hi Folks

 Whats peoples opinions on lowering bikes suspension? with dog bones and sliding the forks through the yolks.

You see the thing I struggle to get my head around  :087: is when a manufacturer invests millions in designing and producing a bike it is set up to operate at it's optimum level based on months and months of research. So if I then go and spend a few quid on a set of dog bones and stick them on the handling surely will deteriorate?

Am I right to be sceptical?

I suffer with the worlds shortest legs so when it comes to bikes my selection is always limited. Or am I missing out for no reason?

 :465: 

Offline chico

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2017, 05:17:58 AM »
I lowered my bike and can't feel any difference except that I'm more confident now that I can plant both feet on terra firma. Unless you are a very aggressive rider I doubt that you'll feel any loss in the handling department. Give it a try, it's not that expensive.
As far as the R&D performed by the manufacturers, they try and find the optimum handling and dimensions for some arbitrary average person. None of us really fit that configuration perfectly. That's why people always make some adjustments after purchase. It's important that you feel comfortable on your bike even if you lose some perceived performance. :300:

Chico

Offline RaglandT

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2017, 05:49:16 AM »
Major downside besides increasing the odds of scrapping a peg is the reduced suspension travel and possibility of topping the wheel.  The 800 is designed with a lot of clearance and if you are only road riding you shouldn't have any problems.  I'd recommend that you approach heavily rutted or rocky trails with caution.  I lowered my xc by 15 mm - not much really but all I needed to compensate for putting on an R front wheel - and have had no issues.

Offline Rtwo

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2017, 06:55:12 AM »
I raised mine 25mm, the handling is improved.
Footpeg strikes aren't as common either, before raising it, they were far too frequent

Tinkering is what happens when you try something you dont quite know how to do, guided by whim, imagination, and curiosity.

Offline Mav

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2017, 07:37:48 AM »
I lowered my Tiger 955i. I didn't notice any difference in handling. The bike felt better to me, as my confidence was boosted being able to put both feet on the ground. The downside was putting the bike on the centre stand, it was a major effort. I would think the modern Tigger will be a little too upright on its side stand. So it might want shortening?

Offline fac191

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2017, 08:39:07 AM »
Rule of thumb is drop the forks a 3rd of what you do the rear.

Offline roadtrip

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2017, 10:41:25 AM »
I think some of Triumph's parameters are pretty arbitrary. How come they chose 100/90-19 for XR front tyre when most road going riders are better off with a radial 110/80R19? The answer I think is they targeted the more (slightly) off road use, either that or it was for appearance.

anyway you're better off setting the bike up for your parameters than the arbitrary average(?) rider. IMO of course!
Davy

Offline rugby536

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2017, 04:09:08 PM »
Lowered mine 25mm and dropped the front by 8mm.  It may be psychological but i thought it handled better!!  I've had no issues.

Offline Bikertone7

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2017, 04:32:53 PM »
Lowered mine I think by 20mm (can't really remember) using dogbones and bringing forks up through the yolks. Made a huge difference as I can also put both feet flat on the floor. Don't forget to put spacers behind the bottom side stand fitting. Only problem I have is that if I lean heavily into a corner I have to angle my toes upwards otherwise I can catch them on the road.
Other Bikes: 1968 Triumph TR6 650cc (american export model), 1991 Transalp XL600V (everyday runabout), 1979 Kawasaki KL250 Trail Bike project.

Offline Pailton

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Re: Lowering Suspension
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2017, 03:14:48 AM »
Thanks for the feed back folks  :028: I guess that's answered that question.

 :031:

 


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