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Offline digger06

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #30 on: December 07, 2017, 01:42:38 AM »
wd40 as 0 ring chain cleaner, that opens a bag of worms, lots of folk maintain it damages 0 rings (used it myself for years though) personally I think its all a marketing ploy so you buy "special" oil.

Offline Kris

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2017, 02:10:09 AM »
*Originally Posted by digger06 [+]
wd40 as 0 ring chain cleaner, that opens a bag of worms, lots of folk maintain it damages 0 rings (used it myself for years though) personally I think its all a marketing ploy so you buy "special" oil.

in that youtube video the guy made a test by putting o-rings in glass tube filled with WD40 and let them sit there overnight, and they were just fine. 
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Offline Kris

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #32 on: December 07, 2017, 02:24:37 AM »
I know, putting grease on friction part of the disc pads is nothing short of embarrassing. Still I need to deal with this and not cry over the spilled milk.   

I read in some forums that it is possible to use blow torch to burn out the oil from the contaminated pads.  since the sintered pads do not absorb oil like organic ones, perhaps this can work.  But I am not sure how much damage this will cause to the pads?

Offline digger06

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2017, 02:50:45 AM »
I,d forget the blowtortch , its a bit severe....when we were younger and owned crappier bikes that leaked etc, we used to put oil contaminated pads into a warm (not boiling) pan of water with lots of persil (soap powder/detergent)for an hour,
or spray cleaner then a good sandpapering of the friction surfaces.both had good results

probably the best way is replacement though,

Offline Kris

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2017, 02:58:27 AM »
my brake pads are 40 pounds each and they are new. Since I am now travelling and need to wait for getting back home, so I might try to burn the oil on the gas stove to improve the braking, and if this does not work, I will change them. 

Regarding the subject of cleaning the calliper, how would Kerosine work?  Just to soak all the parts in Kerosine. 

Online Rtwo

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2017, 06:02:44 AM »
We used to use a blow torch to clean up race pads to good effect.
This was racing on a shoestring so no chance of discarding parts that still had performance in them.

We'd give them a good scrub in a solvent (isopropyl alcohol usually), followed by the blow torch.
The rotors would also get a scrub in solvent with wire wool or similar but spared the blow torch.

Tinkering is what happens when you try something you dont quite know how to do, guided by whim, imagination, and curiosity.

Offline Kris

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #36 on: December 07, 2017, 06:56:05 AM »
*Originally Posted by Rtwo [+]
We used to use a blow torch to clean up race pads to good effect.
This was racing on a shoestring so no chance of discarding parts that still had performance in them.

We'd give them a good scrub in a solvent (isopropyl alcohol usually), followed by the blow torch.
The rotors would also get a scrub in solvent with wire wool or similar but spared the blow torch.

I have completed the process with the front pads.  first soaked them in Thinner (had nothing else here) for 30min, then roasted them on the gas stove (perhaps more than needed), and sanded them with 180 sandpaper.  later today I am going to test them.  hopefully the brakes give more bite. 

Online KildareMan

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #37 on: December 07, 2017, 09:39:52 AM »
*Originally Posted by digger06 [+]
wd40 as 0 ring chain cleaner, that opens a bag of worms, lots of folk maintain it damages 0 rings (used it myself for years though) personally I think its all a marketing ploy so you buy "special" oil.

Great as a cleaner as described.  Not great as a lubricant/barrier for chains as it breaks down too easily.
Stupid is as stupid does.  Look Dad... No hands!!

Offline Kris

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #38 on: December 07, 2017, 10:19:25 AM »
so just to report, my experiment was successful and the front brakes work very well again; can stop with one finger.  i am still concerned that the roasting on fire of the disc pads may have a longer term adverse affect, so I might change the pads when back home.

Offline Kris

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Re: New brake pads, copper grease on the back?
« Reply #39 on: December 09, 2017, 10:57:04 AM »
*Originally Posted by AvgBear [+]
I take it you meant to say WD40?
WD40 is mostly a petrochemical (kerosene / paraffin) and, whilst an effective cleaner, may not be compatible with the rubber parts/seals.
Brake fluid is what's preferred -- won't harm anything internally (may harm paint) -- and actually benefits the seals and interior of the caliper. Altho, dedicated caliper assembly lubes are available:

Apply to pressure seals before inserting into caliper piston bore. Also used to lubricate pistons, prior to installation. Should not be used on dust boots, as these are designed to be installed dry.
This is NOT the same as brake caliper lube, which is used to lubricate sliding, metal parts.  Using caliper lube, instead of caliper assembly lube, may damage your seals and contaminate your brake fluid, leading to problems.  Make sure you use the right stuff!

If I am not mistaken, I see that MuddySump puts copper grease in all the bolts that enter the rubber dust boots or whatever they are called.  Doesn't the rubber get in touch with the grease if they are supposed to stay dry?  Manual insists not to use any mineral grease as it can damage the rubber components.

 


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