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Offline Dilbert

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2019, 12:38:55 PM »
My ICE number is accessible on my phone.
Blood group is automatically checked before they give you a transfusion, or they give you universal donor (O-), this is importatnt for me as I am O-, so can't take any other group.
I don't have any other conditions, or allergies, so for me these tags are a bit of a waste of time and can actually hinder the emergency services, especially the digital versions.
If you have a specific condition, then deffo worth having one, if you don't then I wouldn't personally recommend having one  :028:
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Offline K1W1

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2019, 01:26:56 PM »
*Originally Posted by Dilbert [+]
so for me these tags are a bit of a waste of time and can actually hinder the emergency services, especially the digital versions.

I have ridden with and spent time with many first responders over the years Fire, Ambulance and Police and whenever this subject comes up the resounding response from them is that they NEVER look for this type of info and that it would not be of any use to them if they did. First responders particularly Ambulance are trained to use their skill to immediately assess the situation and to stabilise the patient and get them to a hospital as quickly as possible. If a patient is conscious and lucid they will ask the patient for whatever info they need. If the patient is unconscious or critically injured the skill and training of the responders is used.
ICE phone numbers are essentially a tool for thieves and others who may happen to get hold of a phone. Nobody will EVER ring from a crash site and say. Hello it is Constable X here and I'm just ringing to tell you that your partner/wife/husband has been killed in a crash on Highway 5 I'm currently standing here beside the body and its about to be taken to the city morgue. It will not happen.
All the information on these cards and various other products might be of some assistance once the patient is transported and stabilized or after the patient is declared dead but until one of those things happens it's no of any use to anybody.

Offline PapaTom

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2019, 05:17:42 PM »
Sorry guys I disagree.
I'm retired emergency services and now a first aid trainer.
Procedures discussed are standard within UK training.
UK ambulance crews that I have come across, once able to, will look for these items.
Belt and braces and all that.

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Offline tauzero

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2019, 06:48:50 PM »
I've just asked a paramedic friend what the best approach would be to medical alerts (I'm on anticoagulants as well as a couple of other things so it would be as well to have them know, if I have a bang on the head). He advises Medicalert https://www.medicalert.org.uk/- paramedics will look for bracelets, necklaces, etc. He also mentions that there's a green dot scheme, where information is put on a card inside the helmet, and a green dot sticker on the outside shows it's there. As he points out, though, Medicalert is always there, not just when you're riding.

This applies in the UK, other countries evidently have other procedures or no procedures at all. I would also add that relying on your phone is a bit risky as any crash that damages you significantly could also do the same to your phone. Or your injuries could result from someone mugging you to nick your phone.
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Offline Rtwo

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2019, 07:30:57 PM »
Is it common for casualties to get harmed as a result of medics not having a medical history?
I wouldn't have thought so

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Offline tauzero

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2019, 07:48:50 PM »
The fact that I had my appendix out 45 years ago wouldn't be of any great help, but the fact that I'm on anticoagulants and suffer from atrial fibrillation and high blood pressure might well be (the type 2 diabetes is only marginal, someone with type 1 or severe type 2 would have more potential for problems).
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Offline John Will

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Re: ID and medical info
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2019, 07:57:21 PM »
I use a one life arm band as a cyclist as well as a motorcyclist, helmets also have a sticker and the home page on the phone also has all the details. iPhones are accessible by emergency services anyway.

 


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