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Offline Dilbert

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2019, 01:11:00 PM »
I did have a problem on a Versys, the outside face was nicely lubricated, but the inner, less easily viewed face was red rusty, the Scottoiler dual injector is a pig to set properly and slips off in use, so it's only doing one side, the idea that you can lube just one side and it will work its way round to the inner face is a fallacy  :028:
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Offline Djairouks

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2019, 01:25:47 PM »
*Originally Posted by Dilbert [+]
I did have a problem on a Versys, the outside face was nicely lubricated, but the inner, less easily viewed face was red rusty, the Scottoiler dual injector is a pig to set properly and slips off in use, so it's only doing one side, the idea that you can lube just one side and it will work its way round to the inner face is a fallacy  :028:

I'm a bit puzzled by your theory on both sides, with my grease can, I spray from the left side only and in the inside of the chain, so left side barelly gets greased and right side never, yet none of my chain rusted nor needed any side greasing  :191:

Offline Dilbert

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2019, 12:45:48 PM »
It's not a theory, if you're spraying lube, or dispensing oil from a can, providing you apply some along the centre of the chain then there will be enough splash/ overspray to cover the inside faces, Scottoilers are supposed to be aimed onto the outside face and somehow according to their literature run right round onto the inside face, it just doesn't work like that in practice.

Back in the day I used to grab a handful of grease (graphite grease was my preference) and run the chain (by hand, not driven by the engine) so that it covered all surfaces, I spray both sides and down to middle now to be sure of coating in the same way.

Largely depends how much you ride and in what weather conditions, rain water thrown up by the back wheel will wash off whatever lube you use, mud and road salt will make it even worse, clean and lubricate your chain more often in bad weather.

Here's one of many articles about dirty, rusty chains and how to fix them, best thins is to avoid getting them rusty in the first place  :028:
http://blog.gearhead.com/tech-tip-tuesday-checking-a-chain-for-wear/
 
This is when I miss my shaft drive 1200 Explorer  :016:
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Offline Djairouks

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2019, 01:05:04 PM »
*Originally Posted by Dilbert [+]
It's not a theory, if you're spraying lube, or dispensing oil from a can, providing you apply some along the centre of the chain then there will be enough splash/ overspray to cover the inside faces, Scottoilers are supposed to be aimed onto the outside face and somehow according to their literature run right round onto the inside face, it just doesn't work like that in practice.

Back in the day I used to grab a handful of grease (graphite grease was my preference) and run the chain (by hand, not driven by the engine) so that it covered all surfaces, I spray both sides and down to middle now to be sure of coating in the same way.

Largely depends how much you ride and in what weather conditions, rain water thrown up by the back wheel will wash off whatever lube you use, mud and road salt will make it even worse, clean and lubricate your chain more often in bad weather.

Here's one of many articles about dirty, rusty chains and how to fix them, best thins is to avoid getting them rusty in the first place  :028:
http://blog.gearhead.com/tech-tip-tuesday-checking-a-chain-for-wear/
 
This is when I miss my shaft drive 1200 Explorer  :016:

I hear you and of course all you say makes sense, still for 10 year I've been riding motorcycles all with chains, I have always used can spray grease from left of the bike, full spray in the middle of chain at Max angle possible, so in fact the chain right side never got lubed and all my 6 motorcycles, never had this side rust, never and I sprayed about 3cm from the chain, so spray spread isn't huge and I never saw any kind of splash significantly layering the right side ! That's why I say it's a theory because my practical experience, doesn't align with what you say.

I installed my Nemo 2 Saturday and it's now running fine after some adjusting, will see if the sides get Rusty following week, if temperature permit for riding in November, which doesn't seem it will.

Offline Dilbert

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2019, 12:39:48 PM »
Whatever you're doing it's working, so I wouldn't worry too much, just stay with what you know, but check the condition all round when you lube.

I tend to clean the chain with a rag soaked with paraffin (kerosene), so any rust would get rubbed off before applying lube, the problem was only when using a Scottoiler as you tend to rely on it to clean and lube the chain  :028:
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Offline Challenger

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2019, 05:37:08 AM »
Hello
I solved the dry chain problem by installing an oil er with a pump and forced feeding of lubricant.
practically noninvasive and autonomous device,
requires connecting the motorcycle (-) and (+ ignition)
I apply oil to the front tooth.
the method of administration is configurable, depending on the tip you put on.
currently uses timing, but it is possible to connect the sensor and the dosage is then dependent on the course.
The oil er is called "Q-man oiler", unfortunately the page is not in English and you need to use a translator.








Online penry

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2019, 06:20:02 AM »
*Originally Posted by Dilbert [+]
The only problem with oils, even thicker viscosity gear oils, is that most of it ends up on the rear wheel the first time out, that's why chain lubes went to dry film.

I lube my bike chains about every 300 miles ( more often if it rains ) and just paint gear oil on the o rings on both sides of the chain and a bit on the rollers as per the manual.
Did it last night prior to my weekly 350 mile commute and it only takes 5 mins start to finish.

I don't drown it in oil and give it a quick wipe with a rag to take off any excess ( there is hardly any ) and I don't get any flecks of oil on the tyre - which is a little odd as I distinctly recall worrying about them on previous chain driven bikes. Rear tyre had more stripes than a zebra.

Been riding shafties for 17 years so maybe I'm doing something different.

See how my chain and sprockets last I guess...
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 06:26:17 AM by penry »
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Offline Djairouks

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2019, 06:37:44 AM »
*Originally Posted by penry [+]
I lube my bike chains about every 300 miles ( more often if it rains ) and just paint gear oil on the o rings on both sides of the chain and a bit on the rollers as per the manual.
Did it last night prior to my weekly 350 mile commute and it only takes 5 mins start to finish.

I don't drown it in oil and give it a quick wipe with a rag to take off any excess ( there is hardly any ) and I don't get any flecks of oil on the tyre - which is a little odd as I distinctly recall worrying about them on previous chain driven bikes. Rear tyre had more stripes than a zebra.

Been riding shafties for 17 years so maybe I'm doing something different.

See how my chain and sprockets last I guess...

That's exactly what I did a week ago before putting the winter cover on, the last days of driving the chain was fine because it wasn't raining, apparently I just need to get used to the fact that with oil and rain, it need more frequent lubing, against my grease cans whose viscosity was so thick it would not dissolve so easily with rain.
But anyway as I allready pointed out with current oil use seems I can at the minimum do 20'000Km with 1l and maybe if it doesn't rain about double that to 40'000Km, which would have cost me about 6 to 12 cans of grease, so basically the cost of the Cobrra is reimbursed in 20'000Km, then it's really cheaper to use the gear oil !

Will see about dripping next season it was snowing yesterday here... I cleaned my wheels thoroughly, jesus the crud layer that needed to be scrubbed off, the degreaser didn't work that much there was a thick layer, so will be able to see wether oil makes it on the rim or not next year.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 06:41:35 AM by Djairouks »

Offline fac191

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2019, 12:21:25 PM »
Had a Scotoiler on mine from new. Same chain for 24,000 mls. Cant remember even adjusting it.

Offline Djairouks

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Re: chain getting dry really fast
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2019, 01:44:41 PM »
*Originally Posted by fac191 [+]
Had a Scotoiler on mine from new. Same chain for 24,000 mls. Cant remember even adjusting it.

I don't really thing perpetual oiling vs greasing every few 100Km, makes a chain last much longer,
as long as oil or grease keeps the chain from rusting, friction won't increase and chains will not see
much difference.
With my Honda the dealer always told me you put enough grease on your chain, I would spray every
400Km and my chain was still fine when sold after 34'000Km, can't say the same about the rear sprocket though, the teeth were starting to bend but the AT gearbox was pretty violent, it must
have played.
I hope the Tiger's chain will last 40'000Km, from the experience with my Honda.

To me the benefit from a chain oiler are just :

1 Less sh*t to clean on your rim and left pant leg
2 Cheaper bottles of oil against expensive grease spray cans
3 Much less bulk to carry during travel adventures in Europe and easy to find oil anywhere

Look at this test, they really say there's not a big impact on friction.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2019, 02:12:55 PM by Djairouks »

 


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