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Offline AvgBear

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2020, 07:31:25 PM »
*Originally Posted by Britigerider [+]
+2
+3
*Originally Posted by Khantahr [+]
Honestly, you're blowing this out of proportion
:0461:
I first used ethanol/gasahol (gasoline + 10% ethyl alcohol) dispensed from a retail pump in 1982 into a fuel-injected turbocharged motorcycle (as a test) with no subsequent problems resulting -- and have been doing so in a myriad of motorcycles since (almost 40 years) with the exact same results (zero problems due to ethanol).
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 07:38:34 PM by AvgBear »
There are a terrible lot of lies going about the world, and the worst of it is that half of them are true.
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Online ENGLISHBANDIT

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2020, 07:51:55 PM »
That's what I said, if using your bike most days you will be fine but if like a lot of uk bikes that put bikes away over winter you need to put stabilizer in your tank. For me I only use the good fuel and still use stabilizer so not a problem for me. But it is damaging bikes, older bike mostly but its still something people should know so they can make there own minds up on what they put in there tanks. I will never use it an less I am touring and its all there is. Daily use you will not have a problem, but leaving a bike over winter with it in is not something I would do.
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Online Paulhere

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2020, 08:20:57 PM »
Acerbis are still producing their plastic tanks. Wonder if they still expand, or found a cure for it.
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Online ENGLISHBANDIT

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2020, 09:34:37 PM »
Yamaha say there plastic tanks are ok up to 10% max
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Offline Britigerider

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2020, 10:50:20 PM »
*Originally Posted by ENGLISHBANDIT [+]
That's what I said, if using your bike most days you will be fine.

Actually, this is what you said!
"From next year all fuel will have 10% ethanol in which is really bad for your bikes when left sitting for any length of time. It is destroying fuel tanks and fuel systems in the US . Ethanol pulls water out of the air and is rusting tanks , clogging injectors and messing up carbs. I will not go into it just look it up. When it comes in next year from what I hear is the premium fuel will become the normal fuel and the normal fuel will be the 10% ethanol. I use fuel stabilise in my bikes over winter anyway. They say as many as 700.000 vehicles will not work on it. Its splitting plastic fuel tanks and rusting tanks. Keep your fuel tanks full over winter and use fuel stabilise if you can. I have already put it in two of my bikes just in case I dont get them out again this year. Look it up. The ethanol has been rusting tanks for the last few years at only 5% when its 10% next year its going to be really bad if you are not on top of it. I have been stripping i29s for the last 15 years and in the last 2 years have really started to see tanks rusting because of it."
You should have finished your rant after the 1st sentence!

Offline Khantahr

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2020, 04:57:15 PM »
You should be using stabilizer if your bikes sits for a couple months anyway, whether it has ethanol or not.

Online ENGLISHBANDIT

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2020, 05:01:49 PM »
I also said if using your bike every day or most days you should not really have any problems. But like a lot of bikers that have more than one bike or do not ride a lot due to work or busy life styles and sometimes bike are parked up for a few months that's when the problems start...... READ THIS   as was mentioned earlier, ethanol is also a potent solvent. As a result, there is a significant risk of serious damage to aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, magnesium alloys, galvanized metals, seals, hoses, cork, fiberglass, rubber, polyurethane and epoxy resin – all of which can be found in the fuel systems of many classic bikes.

Exact numbers are difficult to come by, but the Department for Transport estimates that these side effects of E10 may affect as many as 8.6 million vehicles in the UK – of which as many as 750,000 are bikes.

Biker forums are awash with accounts of classic bike owners who fuelled up and were horrified to discover rapid and heavy damage to their fuel tanks and fuel systems. Fiberglass fuel tanks developing a network of pinhole leaks is a common problem and there are also an astonishing number of accounts of rubber seals around the necks of fuel tanks being broken down within just six months.

I also said if using your bike every day or most days you should not really have any problems. But like a lot of bikers that have more than one bike or do not ride a lot due to work or busy life styles and sometimes bike are parked up for a few months that's when the problems start...... READ THIS   as was mentioned earlier, ethanol is also a potent solvent. As a result, there is a significant risk of serious damage to aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, magnesium alloys, galvanized metals, seals, hoses, cork, fiberglass, rubber, polyurethane and epoxy resin – all of which can be found in the fuel systems of many classic bikes.

Exact numbers are difficult to come by, but the Department for Transport estimates that these side effects of E10 may affect as many as 8.6 million vehicles in the UK – of which as many as 750,000 are bikes.

Biker forums are awash with accounts of classic bike owners who fuelled up and were horrified to discover rapid and heavy damage to their fuel tanks and fuel systems. Fiberglass fuel tanks developing a network of pinhole leaks is a common problem and there are also an astonishing number of accounts of rubber seals around the necks of fuel tanks being broken down within just six months.



Similarly, accounts of cracked or corroded pipes throughout fuel systems are commonplace. This also leads to problems when anything that melts, corrodes or degrades anywhere along the way gets drawn into the engine.

It gets worse. Ethanol also has a high oxygen content, leading to faster rusting whenever it comes into contact with iron. This is compounded further by the fact that ethanol also absorbs water from the air too, leading to an octane-poor layer of fuel at the top of the tank and a less-than-ideal ethanol/water layer loitering at the bottom that can cause engine damage, poor running and difficult starts. On top of all this, some ethanol-blended fuels only have a shelf life of three months or less.

Nearly all petrol vehicles currently on the road can happily use E5 and between 83 per cent and 92 per cent can use E10 – your manufacturer will be able to tell you whether your vehicle is compatible or not. If you are not sure, you will still be able to buy E5 for many years yet – although it may be the Super Grade option rather than the cheaper version. Also, these standards aren’t constant across all countries, so you’ll want to keep your eyes open when filling up abroad.
.

Similarly, accounts of cracked or corroded pipes throughout fuel systems are commonplace. This also leads to problems when anything that melts, corrodes or degrades anywhere along the way gets drawn into the engine.

It gets worse. Ethanol also has a high oxygen content, leading to faster rusting whenever it comes into contact with iron. This is compounded further by the fact that ethanol also absorbs water from the air too, leading to an octane-poor layer of fuel at the top of the tank and a less-than-ideal ethanol/water layer loitering at the bottom that can cause engine damage, poor running and difficult starts. On top of all this, some ethanol-blended fuels only have a shelf life of three months or less.

Nearly all petrol vehicles currently on the road can happily use E5 and between 83 per cent and 92 per cent can use E10 – your manufacturer will be able to tell you whether your vehicle is compatible or not. If you are not sure, you will still be able to buy E5 for many years yet – although it may be the Super Grade option rather than the cheaper version. Also, these standards aren’t constant across all countries, so you’ll want to keep your eyes open when filling up abroad.

Bottom line is I would not use it, and as most people do leave there bikes for some time just be careful that's all. and its not a rant just letting people know just in case they did not know about what it can do to older bikes and any bike left for some time.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 05:09:37 PM by ENGLISHBANDIT »
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Offline Britigerider

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Re: 10% ethanol to be standard fuel next year DO NOT USE IT
« Reply #17 on: August 25, 2020, 09:44:59 PM »
 :180:

 


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