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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2020, 08:03:28 AM »
I had a second attempt last night at trying to measure the exhaust valve clearances. The inlet clearances were all in spec but the exhaust clearances all appear to be the order of 0.1 mm too tight.

However, it is proving very hard to measure the exhaust clearances with total confidence because this has to effectively be done blind - that is, except for the left-hand most valve, you can't see where the feeler gauge is going.

The problem found is that it seems to take a bit of force to get a feeler gauge started but then the drag on the gauge can appear to be relatively light making it difficult to judge which gauge provides an accurate clearance measurement. At best at the moment, there seems to be an uncertainty of about 1 thou (0.025 mm) and therefore I might end up having to take the slightly lower reading to be on the safe side :084:

In fact, the MuddySump video on measuring valve clearances (on a bike with 8k on the clock) seems to demonstrate this problem because, for the two exhaust clearances that are measured, he manages to get both the .325 mm and .375 mm feeler gauges to slide freely between the cam lobe and the bucket. For this bike, I would have thought the .375 mm gauge would have been no go given the exhaust clearances close up over time.

I will have one last go but, as said, I might have to err on the side of caution and assume each exhaust clearance is 1 thou less than the largest feeler gauge that appears to be a sliding fit.
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Offline mcinlb

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2020, 09:22:30 AM »
I had to bend the feeler gauges to get them to slide into the exhaust valves , I think muddy does the same..

Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2020, 11:52:49 AM »
I bent the feeler gauges even more than MuddySump but still had problems getting consistent measurements. However, after two days of trying and at least 6-8 sets of measurements, I finally learned how to measure the exhaust clearances reliably on the Tiger 800 :028:

The final set of results were interesting in that every exhaust valve clearance was identical - basically between 11-12 thou (0.279 - 0.304 mm). At least that gives me confidence that all the exhaust valves are all ageing in the same way!

Also interesting was that all the exhaust shims were identical at 2.55 mm which were all checked with a micrometer. In order to reset all the clearances to 0.375 mm, I would need to change the shims to 1.55 mm. However, the smallest Triumph do is 1.70 mm and so I settled for ordering 6 of these. In principle, these should reset the exhaust valve clearances to 0.366 mm which is good enough for my purposes.

I don't expect my Tiger 800 XCA to get to 24k but if I was to lose another 0.1 mm of exhaust valve clearance in the next 12k miles, I'm not sure I would then be able to re-shim them - I would need 0.55 mm shims which are not available.
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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2020, 11:54:54 AM »
Just realised I got the decimal point in the wrong place! I think I will need to phone the Triumph spare department to change my order!
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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2020, 04:07:40 PM »
The shims in my XCA were all marked 255 and I inadvertently took this to be .255 when I originally calculated the new shim sizes. I should have taken this to be 2.55 mm and so I have now ordered 6 x 245 shims.
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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2020, 02:26:29 PM »
I am going to have to wait until next week to get the new shims and, so in the meantime, I thought I would overhaul the rear end. Back wheel is now off, along with the rear suspension drop link and the swinging arm. Unfortunately, on my Tiger 800 XCA, to remove the swinging arm first requires the silencer to be removed which requires the RH pannier rack to be removed.

Plan is to inspect all the seals and to then re-grease all the bearings. I had previously bought a new set of sprockets and chain, and these will now replace the existing components even though these are in reasonable condition. Like a lot of modern bikes with mono-shock rear suspension, this type of overhaul is normally pretty straightforward.
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Offline Stevie.P

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2020, 03:38:52 PM »
I've just got back from the Triumph dealer (pretty wet out there) and have ordered the 3 tools required do the camshaft timing. I probably have a punch, have loads, that would fit the crank and could have asked one of the lads at my old workplace to make me the locking plate but I just can't be fussed messing. Just my luck I knew the bill would be about 70 but apparently Triumph put all its parts prices up today :172: and it was a few pence short of 80. I could probably have come home and still ordered on Fowlers or W.O.T showing the old prices but then I'd have had to pay a large part of the difference in P & P. Just need to order the torque driver that I decided on from ebay now and I'll be set ..... :164: 2020 or ...2021 or ... 2022 or ...  :008:
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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #27 on: October 02, 2020, 07:32:33 PM »
I am lucky to have a lathe and was able to knock up a suitable (round) locking bar in about 10 minutes. With this you can then obviously do the check and see if the valve timing needs to be adjusted. Slightly ironic that the cost of a new timing chain appears to be similar to the cost of the special tools needed to compensate for a slightly worn chain :084:
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Online Rtwo

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #28 on: October 05, 2020, 08:00:09 AM »
Re the special tools
You can presume that the chain is under tension before you start?
So do the chain timing before doing the shims

No special tools needed

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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #29 on: October 05, 2020, 08:13:35 AM »
I think you still ideally need the locking bar to set the two camshafts in the correct orientation. On mine, the cam sprocket timing marks are very small and I doubt I could accurately position the camshafts with these :084:
Suzuki GSX1400, Armstrong MT560 + collection of classic British bikes

 


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