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Offline awjdthumper

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The Dreaded 12k Service
« on: September 28, 2020, 05:55:28 PM »
I bought my 2017 Tiger 800 XCA in March with 11k on the clock but it is now in the workshop ready for the 12k service. I did toy with asking MuddySump to do the service but, in the end, decided to bite the bullet and do it myself, especially since I'm a fairly experienced mechanic! Stage 1 was getting the bike on to the hydraulic ramp which was far from easy given its weight.

Stage 2 was removing the tank. However, I knew it was going to be a fairly massive job given the enormous amount of bits that have to be removed to get at the valve clearances. A couple of dozen fasteners later, all the trim was removed, including the beak, to enable me to get at the tank. Trickiest thing about removing the tank was disconnecting the two electrical connectors and the fuel connector from under the tank. My fingers are reasonably strong but it always seems to take a lot of squeezing to remove these types of connector.

Unfortunately, progress then ground to a halt because a socket head screws holding down one of the input trumpets would not easily budge and there was a likelihood that the socket would strip. I've therefore used some JB Weld to glue my Allen key socket into the screw in the hope that tomorrow it will then unscrew without suffering any damage. I think the problem with the bike is that many of the screws have never been undone since the bike was built and have slightly corroded in the threaded holes.

Stage 3 will be checking (and adjusting) the valve clearances. I've got a 26 blade imperial feeler gauge set on order and am looking forward to seeing how the valve clearances check out given the enormous amount of discussion there's been on this subject. I'm hoping that none of the clearances will need to be adjusted but this may be a bit optimistic :084:

 
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Offline mcinlb

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2020, 07:27:08 PM »
I did the same to my old 2013 Roadie, took me a day to get all the stuff off to get into the engine. But after that it was straight forward, though it is awkward to get the gauges into the exhaust valves.

Luckily all mine valves were in tolerance  , and having just had my 2018 model done by the dealer, yet again all the valves were in tolerance.. :001: :001:

Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2020, 08:40:47 PM »
My 800 XCA was very carefully treated by the previous owner and I very rarely need to rev it above 5000 rpm and so I'm expecting it to be within tolerance - that would be a very good outcome for me. When I bought the Triumph, I didn't anticipate that the valve clearances would need checking at 12k miles especially as the Jap multi-cylinder bikes I have don't need checking until at least 20k miles!
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Offline Rtwo

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2020, 11:35:43 AM »
It's not that bad to work on, there are many, many worse ones

As for the tank connectors, make sure you lift the front of the tank onto the upper mount and just use a bit of 2x2 to hold the rear up.
That should give you enough clearance to get at them easily or buy some more tools, you can never have enough  :001:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Laser-5163-Fuel-Disconnect-Pliers/dp/B005I4YBPI

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Offline Rtwo

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2020, 01:19:30 PM »
...or just cut a piece of 25mm plastic pipe to suit (I 3D print them)

It just reminded me of something at work I need to do periodically I make a clip for holding a component out of the way whilst a pin is inserted and wondered if it would help getting fat fingers around the fuel connector.

It was made for the job  :001:
It pushes the hood out of the way and then a gentle squeeze and a pull and it's off (fnar, fnar  :007: )

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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2020, 05:58:10 PM »
The only electrical connector that I had real difficulty with was on the SAIS valve at the front of the cam cover - in fact, I still haven't managed to unhook it!! Fortunately, the breather tube with the valve can be moved out of the way and so shouldn't be a problem.

My JB Weld trick enabled me to unscrew the last throttle inlet trumpet screw without damaging the socket although it was very tight from corrosion. I then spent well over an hour trying to remove the 3 x ignition coils with the last one refusing to budge even when I used all my considerable strength. In the end, I reasoned that it was not freeing from the spark plug thread and so rotated the coil anti-clockwise to effectively unscrew it from the plug after which it eventually came free.

Then discovered that you have to disconnect the throttle body from the inlet in order to remove the cam cover - mine being a 2017 model with ride-by-wire means the throttle motor gets in the way otherwise. As said, I'm hoping that the valve clearances will all be in spec when I measure them tomorrow.

This afternoon, I collected the 12k service kit (T3990015) from the main Triumph dealer in Oxfordshire which they had in stock. I was prepared for the bill of 162 but am still slightly amazed how expensive the bits are!

As part of the 12k service on my 2017 Tiger 800, I am supposed to do the valve timing check. I need to get my head fully around this but I tentatively believe that, if the timing is within spec, the slots in the ends of the two camshafts should align at TDC for cylinder No 1. Fortunately, this appears to be the case with mine but I need to make up a suitable camshaft tool/bar to confirm this.

Hopefully will measure the valve clearances tomorrow :084:


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Offline ItchyOxter

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2020, 06:19:06 PM »
Fingers crossed mate! I've got to do this lot in a month or so  :087:
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Offline chuckxc

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2020, 11:59:35 PM »
Or another, to release the fuel hose connector, a pair of needle nose pliers with two M6 nuts, one slipped on each prong.
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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2020, 06:42:22 AM »
I have fairly strong hands but even my fingers are a little sore today from all the pressure I had to apply to undo the myriad of Eccoseal electrical connectors - as said, I still haven't been able to disconnect the SAIS valve connector! Fortunately, the fuel line connector wasn't too hard to remove once you realise you have to press in the rubber pads.

I suspect that my 3 year, 12k mileage 800 XCA engine has probably never been touched since it was built but removing the ignition coils was definitely no easy task. At one stage I thought I might end up breaking the connector on it given the force I was having to apply. As said, the trick in the end was to rotate it CCW in order to effectively unscrew it from the spark plug thread which was what was holding it in place.

Today's tasks will be to confirm the valve timing is still within spec which will require a camshaft locking bar to be fabricated, and then to check the valve clearances.
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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: The Dreaded 12k Service
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2020, 08:52:08 AM »
I have just machined up a camshaft locking bar (~0.25" x 4") to accurately check the valve timing. With No 1 at TDC using the crankshaft timing marks, I was then able to insert the locking bar into the slots at the end of the two camshafts. This means the relative timing between the two camshafts is spot on. In principle, the crankshaft timing marks should also be spot on but mine was out by a very small amount, possible the order of 2 degrees at the crankshaft. However, I doubt if the timing could be set more accurately than this and will therefore assume mine is within spec.

Had I needed to adjust the timing, the camshaft sprocket bolts would need to be undone to allow the sprockets to be rotated on each camshaft. With No 1 cylinder at TDC and the camshaft locking bar in place, the trick would then be to do up the sprocket bolts while tensioning the timing chain with the tensioning needing a special Triumph tool.

The valve timing only needs to be done, slightly counter-intuitively, at the 12k service but not at later services - this is presumably because of the need to account for any initial timing chain stretch. Had my valve timing needed to be adjusted, I would have given it a go but this is definitely not a procedure for the faint hearted given the problems that could result if you get it wrong!
Suzuki GSX1400, Armstrong MT560 + collection of classic British bikes

 


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