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DustyBoots, Georgeinabz, Djairouks and 8 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online hawkbox

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2020, 05:56:42 PM »
*Originally Posted by dragon88 [+]
Hi mate and thanks for the welcome. That concept works really well on those casual weekend rides in civilisation. Wait until you are broken down in an Iranian desert or in the jungle of West Bengal...ask me how I know ;) You'll be glad you did your homework in advance. Trust me.

If this is your primary baseline I'd say you should go buy a KLR.

Online Djairouks

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2020, 07:34:18 PM »
*Originally Posted by dragon88 [+]
Thanks for that mate. Some valid points there. Spoke with a friend yesterday who's 18 has twice had run switches fail. Bike has under 40k klms. Apparently issues with water ingress into the switch housing.

This is also pretty irrelevant my 2018 Tiger had some switch issues, just use WD40 and bathe them with it,
then problems gone !

Don't want to fuel the catfight you had earlier, but if you really want to do crazy long distance in very remote
and unfriendly places, the reality is electronics are not your friend, so the Tiger package would not be my pick,
a T700 at most, but older bikes like a Transalp or 90s Africa twin are a smarter choice and less chances that
some thieves want to steal your precious fancy Triumph.
Because a welder or basic electrical parts can be found almost anywhere, fixing TC sensors or an electronic
throttle in the field cannot, just my humble point of view so don't shoot the messenger.

*Originally Posted by hawkbox [+]
If this is your primary baseline I'd say you should go buy a KLR.

Yep that's what it looks like !
« Last Edit: October 01, 2020, 07:42:52 PM by Djairouks »

Online Paulhere

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2020, 08:14:28 PM »
I'd say an XT660 would be better suited to the job of overlanding in remote places. A Gen3 800 wouldn't come into it.....for me.


Is this thread more looking for an insight into these bikes to help the workshop lads diagnose faults. A search on the forum would likely bring up any problem that crops up & usually a remedy. The hot no start that afflicts the 800 + many makes & models has most pro's scratching head.
Current bikes Tiger800 XRx, Tiger Sport 1050, Ariel FH 650, Yam Serow 225.

Online chuckxc

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2020, 10:53:31 PM »
Laterally unstable unless moving.

My third Triple - 1976 Laverda 3CL Jota
My 4cyl grunt - 2005 Honda CB1300F

Offline dragon88

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2020, 12:46:01 AM »
*Originally Posted by Djairouks [+]
This is also pretty irrelevant my 2018 Tiger had some switch issues, just use WD40 and bathe them with it,
then problems gone !

Don't want to fuel the catfight you had earlier, but if you really want to do crazy long distance in very remote
and unfriendly places, the reality is electronics are not your friend, so the Tiger package would not be my pick,
a T700 at most, but older bikes like a Transalp or 90s Africa twin are a smarter choice and less chances that
some thieves want to steal your precious fancy Triumph.
Because a welder or basic electrical parts can be found almost anywhere, fixing TC sensors or an electronic
throttle in the field cannot, just my humble point of view so don't shoot the messenger.

Yep that's what it looks like !

Thanks mate and appreciate the input. I agree with the unfriendliness of modern electronics in hostile environments. It is what it is and hence getting the info beforehand on what can and does go wrong is prudent thinking. IMHO the older bikes whilst reliable and with far less things to go wrong present issues with parts availability. The T700 does not support 2up and loaded weight and thumpers are out, ok for solo travel but again for me, not a 2up machine.

Offline dragon88

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2020, 12:57:32 AM »
*Originally Posted by Paulhere [+]
I'd say an XT660 would be better suited to the job of overlanding in remote places. A Gen3 800 wouldn't come into it.....for me.


Is this thread more looking for an insight into these bikes to help the workshop lads diagnose faults. A search on the forum would likely bring up any problem that crops up & usually a remedy. The hot no start that afflicts the 800 + many makes & models has most pro's scratching head.

The intent of the thread mate was to get an insight into the issues that might arise and how they might be resolved from owners and experienced users. Not only for my benefit but I am sure the other members of the forum could also find the information helpful. It certainly wasn't intended to upset anyone. Having spent a very long time in some very inhospitable places and unfortunately experiencing some major issues with my current Triumph (none electrical) it was very important for me to have a well sorted bike and kit before we hit the road again.

An example, just yesterday I spoke with one of the top tech guys for Triumph in Asia. He absolutely recommended carrying a spare run switch as he see's this as a serious flaw in that model Triumph and one he deals with regularly. It cannot be repaired. In his words, if it fails you are screwed. If just an insight into an issue like this could help another rider not get stuck then it's a win for everyone.

Offline SOHUTAA

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2020, 08:52:47 AM »
*Originally Posted by dragon88 [+]


An example, just yesterday I spoke with one of the top tech guys for Triumph in Asia. He absolutely recommended carrying a spare run switch as he see's this as a serious flaw in that model Triumph and one he deals with regularly.


Avec les traductions, je ne vois pas quoi cela ressemble . . .

Une image peut tre ?

Offline Shergar

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #27 on: October 02, 2020, 11:13:28 AM »
Personally I think this is the way to go in terms of carrying spares
https://adventurebikerider.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=20448

Offline Newhorizons

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2020, 06:45:24 AM »
Personally I would approach this issue from different direction.

I read lots if the threads on this forum leading up to buying a second hand 15 XC prior to a big trip.

Many of the issues you are seeking I suspect are often related to service attitude and in any given riding situation what are you likely to damage or encounter, so :

I replaced the Air filter and fitted a pre sock and carry a spare pre sock. Check all your seals/fixtures.
Moved the front indicators coz they were just looking for trouble
Fitted Bark busters to save controls / levers
Fitted a radiator guard
Greased all my suspension linkages
Drilled extra holes in the beootom of my control blocks to ensure water drainage. (by the time you have played around with your bars and levers they will invariably tilt and hold water, even if only parked up.
Carry a selection of electrical fittings, spare wire, gaffer tape ... bits n pieces, spare globe ..
I removed the battery and applied Dialectic grease to the big fuse block and cleaned up all the drain holes..
Regularly refit all nuts with nyloc or thread lock... and carry spare nuts / bolts
Tyre levers, spare tube (even though I am now tubeless) compressor and plugs
A spanner to remove the front axle !!

More importantly I do all my own service work, and have worked my way through all the bits/pieces... so wiring looms are secure, all electrical plugs have been opened / cleaned and dialectic grease inserted and connectors tensioned if applicable ... you have to annul about wiring & connectors.

Having been a service tech for rehabilitation equipment company over the years the biggest percentage of repairs and faults started with things coming lose or issues not being detected and reported until someone let the smell out. (thats a technical term for the smell produced by a melt down)

Don't ever think the dude that put your bike together at the dealers knew what they were doing or cared, we all have a service story the same. Get your basic service stuff right and you are halfway to a reliable ride I reckon.


Offline Newhorizons

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Re: Gen 3 800. What Goes Wrong?
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2020, 06:54:16 AM »
and just to put the exclamation on that, I have friends who have been halfway around the world exploring 2 up, all the 'stans, road of bones, Europe, Sth America etc, and they all ride BMWs.....(mostly 1250's)

Not because that is their bike of choice but because the tour operators say that brand has the best chance of getting urgent parts in weird and wonderful places anywhere in the world.
AND, when they break you better have plenty of spondula on the card.

Then they butcher parts from the others to keep going = yes they break. (suspension big time, particularly as the later models get lighter)

Back home they ride their Ducatis, KTM's, Huski's, Triumphs & Hondas etc ..

Thrash anything for long enough and your gunna break it.

 


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