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Offline Rick B

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OEM chain
« on: October 24, 2020, 06:40:54 AM »
Out of curiosity whats the average life span of an OEM chain Mines only at 4.5k at the moment but if i could factor one in on the maintenance budget would be grand
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Offline PapaTom

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2020, 07:16:44 AM »
I'm on just over 18k at the moment and it is fine for quite a while yet.
It's a Gen2 bought new, March 18, no auto lube but good chain maintenance throughout.

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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2020, 08:02:14 AM »
After I bought my XCA in March at 11k miles, I was convinced that the rear chain was in need of replacement. However, after a lot of discussion, I realised that the recommended test was to measure 20 links and compare with the 317.6 mm for a new chain with the wear limit specified as a stretch of 1.4 mm; that is, a total length for 20 links of 319 mm.

It's not an easy measurement to do accurately but I surprisingly found mine had only stretched by 0.4 mm and was probably good for 30k miles! However, by that time, I had already bought a new chain and set of sockets and so fitted them at the recent 12k service :087:
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Offline Rick B

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2020, 08:21:23 AM »
Oh great ,Thanks ,
It was just for piece of mind, Im going to give it a clean with parrafin and re-lube it,just not sure wether to use the WD40 wax or get something else,I tried Wurths lube but dont know how and i shook the can but after a run out in the wet ended up with rust showing on the chain so i scrubbed it ant after a trip to Halfords got the WD wax option,which has stopped it but seems to attract sh*t.
Still ,Live and learn
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The Perfect Woman,
A deaf and dumb nymphomaniac that runs an off-licence!

Offline matt748

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2020, 09:24:35 AM »
14,000 miles here OEM, still going strong. Heres an interesting video on chain lube. It may change your opinion on chain maintenance. It did me.


Offline Djairouks

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2020, 09:43:41 AM »
*Originally Posted by matt748 [+]
14,000 miles here OEM, still going strong. Heres an interesting video on chain lube. It may change your opinion on chain maintenance. It did me.

/>

Absolutely as he explains here, chain stretch is not real, I worked in stress test machines industry, those thick metal plates making the chain links, will barely stretch with the meager torque motorcycle put on.
What is wearing is the rollers (outside and axle attaching links, giving false idea of stretch)and sprockets, because of contact stress wear, so the coumpunded diameter of all the sprocket valleys, plus roller deformation or looseness, will give the chain more slack.
Hence why a well lubricated chain, will be fine and you might have to change sprockets that are toast, of course you change everything together so the new parts have the same radiuses, so contact is optimal and stress the lowest between roller and sprocket, but most of the time a chain could in theory last many sprockets, however the changing radius and play in rollers would wear a new sprocket more.

Hope this is understandable  :034:

On my Africa twin, I needed to change the sprockets at 36'000km, the chain could have been kept for reference.

On the Triumph I use the cobrra 2 oiler thing, this is great for the chain and extremely inexpensive, my calculations show roughly 1dl of oil for 10'000km, with the liter costing 6 chain maintenance got extremely cheap.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 09:52:17 AM by Djairouks »

Online Paulhere

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2020, 09:58:10 AM »
Fitted Scottoilers to my bikes for past 25 years, chains last 30k miles when they start to need adjusting, that's them on their way out. Talking 530 chains here, dunno about these 525, first road bike I've had with this thinner chain, only done 13k up to now, I set it when new, not been adjusted, 25k likely.
Current bikes Tiger800 XRx, Tiger Sport 1050, Ariel FH 650, Yam Serow 225.

Offline Djairouks

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2020, 10:05:17 AM »
*Originally Posted by Paulhere [+]
Fitted Scottoilers to my bikes for past 25 years, chains last 30k miles when they start to need adjusting, that's them on their way out. Talking 530 chains here, dunno about these 525, first road bike I've had with this thinner chain, only done 13k up to now, I set it when new, not been adjusted, 25k likely.

My Africa twin as said above did 36'000km with the chain and they are using 525 as well, I could have just changed sprockets and the Africa does 95Nm against 79Nm on the Tiger, so I would expect even more mileage on the Tiger.

Online Stevie.P

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2020, 11:46:45 AM »
*Originally Posted by Djairouks [+]
... the Africa does 95Nm against 79Nm on the Tiger, so I would expect even more mileage on the Tiger.

You can't simply compare the 2. Even as a basic, ignoring maintenance and riding conditions, you would have to at least have confirmed both set ups used the same make and model of chain to assume that, just both being 525 isn't good enough. Triumph fitted the basic cheapest DID 'O' ring chain and I needed to replace at 14k. I replaced with the top of the range DID 'X' ring chain and after 10k has barely needed any adjustment and shows no signs of wear or slack lift at the rear of the wheel sprocket. As the saying goes ... you get what you pay for (subject to fair maintenance in this case).
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Offline Djairouks

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2020, 12:19:32 PM »
*Originally Posted by Stevie.P [+]
You can't simply compare the 2. Even as a basic, ignoring maintenance and riding conditions, you would have to at least have confirmed both set ups used the same make and model of chain to assume that, just both being 525 isn't good enough. Triumph fitted the basic cheapest DID 'O' ring chain and I needed to replace at 14k. I replaced with the top of the range DID 'X' ring chain and after 10k has barely needed any adjustment and shows no signs of wear or slack lift at the rear of the wheel sprocket. As the saying goes ... you get what you pay for (subject to fair maintenance in this case).

Sure I understand that I was speaking more generally, less torque on a smaller chain is equivalent at some point, but what makes you think Honda didn't also cheap out on the chain ?
I can't say if it was a good chain or not, but my XRT is nearing 18'000km now so half what I did with my Honda and the chain is still fine, sprockets look good for a while too.

Are you talking miles, because 14k km would be extremely low even for a cheap chain !?

 


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