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Offline Stevie.P

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2020, 12:49:55 PM »
*Originally Posted by Djairouks [+]
... but what makes you think Honda didn't also cheap out on the chain ?
Are you talking miles, ...


Maybe Honda did or didn't, that was my point, without confirmation comparison is pretty pointless.

Why would I talk kms when UK speeds and limit signs are not metric and I'm British. :027:
You'll be expecting me to give up the good old British pint next which would be awkward as our pubs stills sell in pints. :110:
Also owned my 1979 Bonnie T140E from new!

We don't stop playing because we grow old .. WE GROW OLD BECAUSE WE STOP PLAYING!!!


Offline Djairouks

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2020, 12:56:03 PM »
*Originally Posted by Stevie.P [+]

Maybe Honda did or didn't, that was my point, without confirmation comparison is pretty pointless.

Why would I talk kms when UK speeds and limit signs are not metric and I'm British. :027:
You'll be expecting me to give up the good old British pint next which would be awkward as our pubs stills sell in pints. :110:

People should specify, there's enough Aussies and other mericans and Europeans, so your chain lasted near my actual mileage and mine is far from shot  :084:, I seem to somehow spare chains dealers are always as puzzled as me.

It's so much cooler to be in a British or Irish pub and ask for a pinth, in french it's not as manly  :008:

Offline AvgBear

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2020, 05:37:12 PM »
Yes, comparisons can be difficult with so many variables. The environment in which the chain lives, for example, can be critical -- with enclosed, lubed, chains being the longest lasting.
Size and quality also affect life -- sometimes bigger isn't better. There was a time, in the early '70s (when chains were much poorer), that #60 (3/4" pitch) rear drive chains were tried with worse results than the early failing - back then - #50/530 chains. They were heavier, w/greater centrifugal force and, due to space considerations, had fewer sprocket teeth. Conversely, #40/428h/1/2" pitch chain can, if high quality and not applied beyond specs, last quite long due to the much greater number of sprocket teeth allowed.
The strength of a 525 (all other specs being equal) might be better than a 530? Less width may cause less pin flex? 520, popular MX size, may even be better (strength-wise)?
Then, too -- all riders ride a bit differently. Some are gentle with the throttle and others not quite so... Power corrupts...
Ultimately, they all wear-out...eventually.
There are a terrible lot of lies going about the world, and the worst of it is that half of them are true.
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Offline Djairouks

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2020, 05:50:16 PM »
*Originally Posted by AvgBear [+]
Yes, comparisons can be difficult with so many variables. The environment in which the chain lives, for example, can be critical -- with enclosed, lubed, chains being the longest lasting.
Size and quality also affect life -- sometimes bigger isn't better. There was a time, in the early '70s (when chains were much poorer), that #60 (3/4" pitch) rear drive chains were tried with worse results than the early failing - back then - #50/530 chains. They were heavier, w/greater centrifugal force and, due to space considerations, had fewer sprocket teeth. Conversely, #40/428h/1/2" pitch chain can, if high quality and not applied beyond specs, last quite long due to the much greater number of sprocket teeth allowed.
The strength of a 525 (all other specs being equal) might be better than a 530? Less width may cause less pin flex? 520, popular MX size, may even be better (strength-wise)?
Then, too -- all riders ride a bit differently. Some are gentle with the throttle and others not quite so... Power corrupts...
Ultimately, they all wear-out...eventually.

Very interesting infos dude thanks for that, there's also a strange factor they explain on gearing commander.
That if front to rear numbers are "round" (15/45) the same link would contact the same teeth more often and so increase wear.

Offline Paulhere

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2020, 06:41:07 PM »
My old Yam Traillie had oem 15/45/120, worst of all worlds re Gearing commander. I changed to 16/47/122, it's a 225cc approx 18bhp, the 428 chain is really only suitable for 125cc power, every little help makes it last a tad longer.

The old 35 - 45bhp Brit 650's were mostly 5/8" x 3/8" (530) Norton used 5/8" x 1/4" (520) on some to save weight, chains weren't sealed back then, so they didn't last very long, nowadays the sealed chains are too wide to fit most of those old bikes, some have gone to 520 or 525 conversions to enable the O or X ring chains to fit.

My '58 Ariel FH has the 5/8" x 3/8" chain with 2 oem built in chain oilers, very clever back in the 1950's, they used primary & engine oil, so needed regular topping up. Those old bikes did get slagged off for oil leaks but some leaks were intentional.
Current bikes Tiger800 XRx, Tiger Sport 1050, Ariel FH 650, Yam Serow 225.

Offline Stevie.P

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2020, 07:52:42 PM »
*Originally Posted by Djairouks [+]
Very interesting infos dude thanks for that, there's also a strange factor they explain on gearing commander.
That if front to rear numbers are "round" (15/45) the same link would contact the same teeth more often and so increase wear.

Yes, my Bonneville standard figures are 20/47 sprockets and 107 chain links (which makes it a pain obtaining a cranked link). Not sure if the chain links are currently an even number (see below) and the Tiger is obviously 16/45 and 124 links.

*Originally Posted by Paulhere [+]
My old Yam Traillie had oem 15/45/120, worst of all worlds re Gearing commander. I changed to 16/47/122, it's a 225cc approx 18bhp, the 428 chain is really only suitable for 125cc power, every little help makes it last a tad longer.

The old 35 - 45bhp Brit 650's were mostly 5/8" x 3/8" (530) .... some have gone to 520 or 525 conversions to enable the O or X ring chains to fit.

Yes I converted my Bonneville from 5/8" x 3/8" to 520 'O' ring chain. As said the extra width of the 'O' rings on the original size would make it too wide to fit between the primary and gearbox casting. I did the conversion (mid-late 90s) because at the time my Bonnie was my main means of transport and I never had time for chain maintenance .... just MOT time ...  :164: so nothing much has changed with the Tiger. :008:
Also owned my 1979 Bonnie T140E from new!

We don't stop playing because we grow old .. WE GROW OLD BECAUSE WE STOP PLAYING!!!


Offline Newhorizons

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2020, 12:39:27 PM »
Agree with the crowd, its really hard to compare 'chain' stories. Particularly with temperatures and different road conditions and usage... etc

FWIW, I replaced mine at just under 25klm, and whilst it was in reasonably good condition overall and considering I am super fussy with cleaning and oiling... following a long trip, high speeds and warm to hot weather mine developed noticeable 'tight spots'.

So you HAVE to adjust gap/tension to the 'tightest' part of the chain, and when you realise that it is noticeably loose on the other side, guess what....time to change it.

If you are only puttering around the streets then you can cheat for a while but if you are doing serious trips with highway speeds then you are pushing the boundaries for sure.

ps, I agree with the others the OEM chain is a good brand in name only, it isn't the same as the real aftermarket same brand

Offline hawkbox

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2020, 08:54:49 PM »
My first chain lasted to 50k km with fairly reasonable maintenance, my second chain is at 30k km right now with minimal maintenance and looks to have easily another 10k km on it.

Offline felix

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2020, 04:55:00 PM »
Currently on 24,500 miles...... still on original chain and sprockets..... and chain rubbing strip.... has a scottoiler.....  probably help lifetime.... but regular checks and correct adjustment / tension goes a long way....

Online Rtwo

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Re: OEM chain
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2020, 05:15:55 PM »
I have one of these, which makes it very easy to check chain length against specs

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