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Offline awjdthumper

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Re: Service
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2021, 06:57:08 AM »
When I did my full 12k service, I used a combination of the Haynes manual and the MuddySump videos with the latter being invaluable. Even with me doing the work, the total cost was the order of 250 for parts and consumables + 100 for a new chain and sprockets. The Triumph service kit at ~160 was particularly expensive. I think the cost of the 12k service would have been about 7.5 man hours and 650 at a Triumph main dealer?
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Offline mcinlb

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Re: Service
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2021, 08:48:57 AM »
When my XRX was due for the 12k service, again using Muddy Sump and a manual, I did a lot of the auxiliary stuff myself - Head Bearings grease, Swinging arm grease, Suspension linkage greasing etc..
Only asked the dealer to do a 12k on the engine, which they were quite happy to do, saved some money and had some satisfaction in doing the other stuff myself... 

Offline ItchyOxter

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Re: Service
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2021, 10:35:17 AM »
I do most of my own servicing due to the fact that I don't trust most (not all) dealers to carry out everything that is required with a certain amount of care and attention. I very much doubt most service departments would check/grease headset and swigarm bearings on the 12000 mile service and if they did I'm sure you would see the cost go up again. In my opinion, part of the problem is that triumph require so much to be done at such an early stage of the mileage. The checking of headset/swingarm bearings and valves at 12000 miles is, to me, almost to double check that the factory put enough grease and adjusted everything properly on assembly. Its the only fly in the ointment for me on this bike!
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Offline Stevie.P

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Re: Service
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2021, 11:08:24 AM »
*Originally Posted by Half-Click-Up [+]
I've always been a big fan of actual manufacturer factory service manuals. Are there great advantages to the Haynes manual over the factory manual?

IMO a factory workshop manual tends to be more for guiding a competent DIY'er/qualified mechanic with all the basic skills knowledge and usually only has basic line drawings throughout. The Haynes manual, though becoming more limited for the DIY'er due to electronics and required equipment, has always been aimed pretty much at the beginner upwards, grading tasks with a spanner rating easy to hard and having hundreds of actual real photographs of the stages of the task. Ideally having both manuals is the answer. The Haynes used to be produced on pretty good quality paper with good pictures but I guess a sign of the times economically and with online competition the physical versions of the manuals are now on very flimsy version of their older self but I still think the book over their annual online fee version is better value for money. :027:
Also owned my 1979 Bonnie T140E from new!

We don't stop playing because we grow old .. WE GROW OLD BECAUSE WE STOP PLAYING!!!


Offline Stevie.P

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Re: Service
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2021, 11:58:26 AM »
*Originally Posted by ItchyOxter [+]
I do most of my own servicing due to the fact that I don't trust most (not all) dealers to carry out everything that is required with a certain amount of care and attention.

 :0461: I took out a 3yr service plan on my Tiger to ensure no warranty issues and also it was actually good value compared to the average PAYG costs members have reported. However when it finished I was asked by the dealer why I didn't consider another plan. I told him straight out that for the 12 & 18k services both times the service check sheet had been ticked as serviceable on the simple 30s visual check of the rider footpeg bank/lean sensors studs and the RH one had been sheared off since between the 6k and 12k point, so if I couldn't trust that something as clear and obvious as that to have been done (twice) how did they expect me to trust them that they had actually done the invisible items like valve clearance checks, spark plug change, etc. Also on the 6k and 12k service I took the bike back and demanded they change the chain rubbing strip (worn or not, or give me the new one) as it was on the schedule and the service plan price included all scheduled parts and also on the 12k I had them take it back a second time and request that they properly service and grease the rear suspension drop linkage as it was so clear nothing had been touched as all the nuts and bolts were still caked in undisturbed mud. :023:

The only person I trust to do the jobs 100% properly is myself.
Also owned my 1979 Bonnie T140E from new!

We don't stop playing because we grow old .. WE GROW OLD BECAUSE WE STOP PLAYING!!!


Offline Half-Click-Up

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Re: Service
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2021, 03:12:31 PM »
*Originally Posted by Stevie.P [+]
IMO a factory workshop manual tends to be more for guiding a competent DIY'er/qualified mechanic with all the basic skills knowledge and usually only has basic line drawings throughout. The Haynes manual, though becoming more limited for the DIY'er due to electronics and required equipment, has always been aimed pretty much at the beginner upwards, grading tasks with a spanner rating easy to hard and having hundreds of actual real photographs of the stages of the task. Ideally having both manuals is the answer. The Haynes used to be produced on pretty good quality paper with good pictures but I guess a sign of the times economically and with online competition the physical versions of the manuals are now on very flimsy version of their older self but I still think the book over their annual online fee version is better value for money. :027:

Good to know... I know both Haynes and Chilton have cult followings, but I've never perused either brands. Think I might grab a Haynes for good measure since I am brand new to Triumph, maybe worth it for the pictures alone. Thanks Stevie!  :062:
2014 Triumph Tiger 800A
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