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Offline Jarse

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2021, 09:46:35 AM »
*Originally Posted by Mrski1 [+]
Always interested to see if there are other local riders!

Fingers crossed, when I first looked back in 2019 I got frustrated at the lack of local bikes available and bought my Bandit as a stop-gap, 2 years later I still have it!

I guess you have spoken to the team at Shirlaws? Great service from the folks there 😎

Offline Mrski1

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2021, 07:34:15 PM »
*Originally Posted by Jarse [+]
I guess you have spoken to the team at Shirlaws? Great service from the folks there 😎

Yep, a great place that and they have a lovely XRX in, but it doesn't have a lot of the extras I'd hope for it to have.

Offline Djairouks

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2021, 06:59:40 AM »
*Originally Posted by Mrski1 [+]
Thanks, I have found two I am interested in so far, a 1st gen 2014 XC, and a 2016 XRX although this one doesn't come with any luggage, heated grips, engine bars or fog lamps so would be quite pricey once everything is added on, plus I prefer the XC for some reason.

Those service intervals are similar to my current Bandit, although the minor service on that is approx 4k miles, and major 14.5k miles. Even the Honda VFR800X Crossrunner I had also been looking at is a major service at 16k miles, although most owners who have carried it out never have issues with valve clearances at that stage, and a lot still don't need any work at the 32k service.

But the VFR valve service is a nightmare, because of V-TEC and well twice the amount of cam shafts
being a V engine not inline, so if you're doing your maintenance know what you're getting into, in the
case of a dealership doing it expect a pretty steep bill as well.

Nowadays with all the premium coating science inside the valve trains, it's more of an initial setup
issue or parts tolerances, but for the most part in 10 years none of my motorcycles needed any big
valve adjustment, it's not because it's Honda.

Offline awjdthumper

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2021, 07:51:46 AM »
*Originally Posted by Mrski1 [+]
Those service intervals are similar to my current Bandit, although the minor service on that is approx 4k miles, and major 14.5k miles. Even the Honda VFR800X Crossrunner I had also been looking at is a major service at 16k miles, although most owners who have carried it out never have issues with valve clearances at that stage, and a lot still don't need any work at the 32k service.
The 12k major service intervals for my Tiger 800 is not a real issue for me but it does make me wonder why my large multi-cylinder Suzuki and Yamaha bikes manage major service intervals of 24k miles :084:
Suzuki GSX1400, Armstrong MT560 + collection of classic British bikes

Offline Djairouks

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2021, 08:10:16 AM »
*Originally Posted by awjdthumper [+]
The 12k major service intervals for my Tiger 800 is not a real issue for me but it does make me wonder why my large multi-cylinder Suzuki and Yamaha bikes manage major service intervals of 24k miles :084:

Simple, because the 800 is supposed to be ridden hard supposedly in dirt, or for long distances,
so they want to be on the safe side.

The motorcycle I had the longest was a Yami FZ8, with 30'000km intervals back in 2012, but the
engine was a watered down R1 to 800cc, so seems logical that the engine intervals can be pushed
back, as for the tiger being derived from smaller 675 engine might also be a reason in the opposite
direction, but I do think from what the dealer said, this is exagerrated !

Offline Mrski1

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2021, 11:08:52 AM »
*Originally Posted by Djairouks [+]
But the VFR valve service is a nightmare, because of V-TEC and well twice the amount of cam shafts
being a V engine not inline, so if you're doing your maintenance know what you're getting into, in the
case of a dealership doing it expect a pretty steep bill as well.

Nowadays with all the premium coating science inside the valve trains, it's more of an initial setup
issue or parts tolerances, but for the most part in 10 years none of my motorcycles needed any big
valve adjustment, it's not because it's Honda.

Oh yes the VFR valve service is a pain, and several I looked at had not had it done because of the 'Honda reputation'.

It was more an observation that similar capacity bikes to the Tiger 800 have similar service intervals regardless of being Japanese and the perceived reliability compared to other brands, and from reading the Suzuki Bandit forums, plenty of those bikes required adjustment.

Offline Djairouks

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Re: Newbie In Scotland
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2021, 03:41:01 PM »
*Originally Posted by Mrski1 [+]
Oh yes the VFR valve service is a pain, and several I looked at had not had it done because of the 'Honda reputation'.

It was more an observation that similar capacity bikes to the Tiger 800 have similar service intervals regardless of being Japanese and the perceived reliability compared to other brands, and from reading the Suzuki Bandit forums, plenty of those bikes required adjustment.

Of course it's physics after stress and cycles of heating and cooling, parts are going to move and need
adjustment, you can engineer stuff to minimize the effect, but at the end of the day you can't beat
physics.

 


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