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Offline pahiker

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  • Bike: `21 Tiger 900GT
  • Location: Pennsylvania US
Re: Buying Tiger 900 without test ride
« Reply #20 on: July 24, 2021, 01:04:23 AM »
With the spotty supply of motorcycles if you can find one that you like I'd go for it. Triumph seems to have a decent amount of product on the showroom floor compared to the Japanese bikes. I was lucky and got the model I wanted with the color I wanted 😀. Hoping the supply chain problems improve and showrooms are soon packed with bikes like the pre covid days.

Offline AndrewNZ

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  • Bike: 900 GT Pro
  • Location: Richmond NZ
Re: Buying Tiger 900 without test ride
« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2021, 05:42:13 AM »
Every bike coming into NZ is now sold due to the poor supply.
You are only jealous as the voices are speaking to me! Honda 90 Sport, Lambretta 200 GT, Honda 250 sport, then a 25 year gap, Harley Davidson 900 Sportster, Harley Davidson 1600 Fat Bob, Triumph Explorer Gen I, Triumph Explorer Gen II, Triumph 900 GT Pro.

Offline mcman56

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  • Bike: 2018 XRx Low
  • Location: California
Re: Buying Tiger 900 without test ride
« Reply #22 on: July 24, 2021, 03:52:04 PM »
Not the same bike but maybe similar experience.  I had never ridden any Triumph and currently owned a GSX1250FA but wanted something lighter.  I sat on a new Tiger low (850 or 900, not sure) and liked the ergonomics plus specs.  Being frugal, I looked around for a used Tiger low but there were none local.  I ended up buying a 2018 800 XRX with 3500 miles remotely.  The bike came from a dealer and I paid with a credit card but did not see it until it was delivered to my door.  It was a little spooky buying sight unseen but worked out well.  Compared to a Japanese bike, the engine is kind of noisy with mechanical sounds.  The ride modes are cute but power delivery is quite soft and the thing is no rocket ship so I don't know why they are there.  The power band is nice and wide.  The electronic cruise control is quite nice.  The suspension, even on the low model, is well balanced (unlike many Japanese bikes) and well controlled. 
The only thing I consider a little quirky is the ride by wire when starting from a stop.  As I am letting out the clutch and opening the throttle, I can feel the influence of another control mechanism.  Instead of a smooth steady rpm raise, I get sort of an "oo ah oo ah oo ah" not so smooth raise as the computer and I compete to set the throttle until the clutch is fully released.  I am not launching hard and don't mean to imply that it is in any way extreme but am used to getting a perfectly smooth rpm raise/ sound when starting out.  It could be that I tend to use less rpm than the computer thinks is appropriate.   I am getting used to it but maybe other riders have some advice on this.                         

Offline lanch

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  • Bike: Tiger 900 GT Pro
  • Location: Nuneaton
Re: Buying Tiger 900 without test ride
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2021, 10:22:07 PM »
*Originally Posted by AndrewNZ [+]
I had the turbine smooth 1200 Explorer prior to getting the GT Pro without a test ride.
I literally rode it for the first time from within the showroom by the time I had done 500 metres I was asking myself "What have I done?".
But!
It is so different from the Explorer that I had to become accustomed to it which didn't take long at all and in the first week I did 2000 kms and loved it to bits.
The Explorer was heavy with a high C of G but the GT Pro being 60 kg lighter means that it is nimble, lively and and easy to move around.
There is always something that will niggle most people, the GPS not being user friendly is mine, and there is no such thing as the perfect bike but I am very pleased with mine and a friend having ridden mine is picking his up in three weeks. He was test riding the Rally Pro and we did a swop and the GT Pro is the right one for me as I'm not into the loose stuff riding but the little I have done on the GT Pro it handled it very well.
I'm not going to say go buy it or don't buy it without a test ride this is just my experience only you can make the as to what you do.

P.S. The white one is the fastest!  :038:
I could have written this post, as I did the same. I only saw the bike in the flesh when I took my Explorer in, and part-exed it for a red GT Pro. No regrets, the Explorer did the job, but I,m enjoying the 900 more. 

Offline awjdthumper

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  • Bike: Tiger 800 XCA
  • Location: Abingdon
Re: Buying Tiger 900 without test ride
« Reply #24 on: July 29, 2021, 07:09:22 AM »
*Originally Posted by mcman56 [+]
Not the same bike but maybe similar experience.  I had never ridden any Triumph and currently owned a GSX1250FA but wanted something lighter.  I sat on a new Tiger low (850 or 900, not sure) and liked the ergonomics plus specs.  Being frugal, I looked around for a used Tiger low but there were none local.  I ended up buying a 2018 800 XRX with 3500 miles remotely.  The bike came from a dealer and I paid with a credit card but did not see it until it was delivered to my door.  It was a little spooky buying sight unseen but worked out well.  Compared to a Japanese bike, the engine is kind of noisy with mechanical sounds.  The ride modes are cute but power delivery is quite soft and the thing is no rocket ship so I don't know why they are there.  The power band is nice and wide.  The electronic cruise control is quite nice.  The suspension, even on the low model, is well balanced (unlike many Japanese bikes) and well controlled. 
The only thing I consider a little quirky is the ride by wire when starting from a stop.  As I am letting out the clutch and opening the throttle, I can feel the influence of another control mechanism.  Instead of a smooth steady rpm raise, I get sort of an "oo ah oo ah oo ah" not so smooth raise as the computer and I compete to set the throttle until the clutch is fully released.  I am not launching hard and don't mean to imply that it is in any way extreme but am used to getting a perfectly smooth rpm raise/ sound when starting out.  It could be that I tend to use less rpm than the computer thinks is appropriate.   I am getting used to it but maybe other riders have some advice on this.                       
Bought my 2017 800 XCA in a similar way but was absolutely pleased with it when it was delivered from the dealer. I also find the ride-by-wire throttle takes some getting used to and I have to be very careful when pulling away quickly from a junction to avoid stalling. In my case, I think this is due the lack of mechanical feedback you normally get with a throttle cable attached to a spring loaded mechanism at the other end. I therefore tend to have to conscientiously raise the revs a little first before starting to let the clutch out which is fine when I have the time to think about it but less easy to do in a hurry which sometimes results in a stall.
Suzuki GSX1400, Armstrong MT560 + collection of classic British bikes

 


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