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Offline TigerBC

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2021, 03:51:55 AM »
I've broken the peg off the sidestand bracket that the spring connects to a couple of times now but have yet to have any problems with the switch.  Water doesn't seem to affect the switch.

Offline Newhorizons

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2021, 04:22:03 AM »
Thanks guys, that sounds good.

I have replaced the wiring from that switch and cut out the plug .. which I couldn't undo anyway. Soldered in a new section and routed that well protected wire up near the battery and joined it to the main loom with a few crimp connectors. Put a piece of yellow tape around that spot so if I ever have a problem its only a matter of cutting the wires near the crimp and twisting the loom wires together.
Also moved the brake light wiring which ran through that area, which now runs in front of the battery down the frame onto the brake switch.
I had O2 Wideband meter wiring down there as well, so stripped that out and re taped and now safely up near the Battery. I have a Commander V part in the end of the standard loom end it was not in a good place so it is safely tucked away.

Offline Newhorizons

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2021, 04:46:46 AM »
Hey Dragon, anything that you have changed or modified for the conditions that you ride in .... given you have so many wet experiences.

The one trick I did last night was drilling a small hole in the bottom of the air box, drilled & taped a 1/4 inch thread. Then drilled through the top to bottom of a short 1/4 bolt (now hollow inside) , cut the head of , and threaded that threaded section into the hole.

Then fitted a piece of clear hose onto the thread sitting below the air box. This hose sits out maybe 12 cm just above the gear change arm which is a clear area up to the air box. You can touch it with your fingers.

Because its in the LH front corner of the lower section of the box, (below the filter) when on the side stand that will be the drain point so when I walk up to the bike after any water crossings I will be able to check that hose.

Screwed a smaller bolt into the end of the tube to make it air tight. So I can look at that short section of clear hose now - if there is any water in the base of the air filter box I can see it visually in the tube. Then remove the small bolt and drain it.

Because pulling the Tank and removing the top of the Airbox etc is just way toooo complex. That area down in the air box there would probably hold a litre or more of water and ... then if the Oiled K&N Filter (versus the paper element) may hopefully restrict water ingestion ? I can minimise awkward outcomes.

Hope never to test it to that level but that's often more luck than good management.

Offline Newhorizons

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2021, 04:49:33 AM »
Damn, that's my blood on the frame, sorry. Unpicking the main loom and slipped with the blade.
Didnt realise I created a crime scene.

Offline dragon88

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2021, 03:05:22 AM »
Definitely a pre filter, a chain oiler (Cobbra) and while I dont like huggers of any kind I fabbed up a protector for the rear shock to keep the crap off it.


*Originally Posted by Newhorizons [+]
Hey Dragon, anything that you have changed or modified for the conditions that you ride in .... given you have so many wet experiences.

The one trick I did last night was drilling a small hole in the bottom of the air box, drilled & taped a 1/4 inch thread. Then drilled through the top to bottom of a short 1/4 bolt (now hollow inside) , cut the head of , and threaded that threaded section into the hole.

Then fitted a piece of clear hose onto the thread sitting below the air box. This hose sits out maybe 12 cm just above the gear change arm which is a clear area up to the air box. You can touch it with your fingers.

Because its in the LH front corner of the lower section of the box, (below the filter) when on the side stand that will be the drain point so when I walk up to the bike after any water crossings I will be able to check that hose.

Screwed a smaller bolt into the end of the tube to make it air tight. So I can look at that short section of clear hose now - if there is any water in the base of the air filter box I can see it visually in the tube. Then remove the small bolt and drain it.

Because pulling the Tank and removing the top of the Airbox etc is just way toooo complex. That area down in the air box there would probably hold a litre or more of water and ... then if the Oiled K&N Filter (versus the paper element) may hopefully restrict water ingestion ? I can minimise awkward outcomes.

Hope never to test it to that level but that's often more luck than good management.

Offline stevedo

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2021, 08:00:09 PM »
My bike has 80,000 miles and I've had no issues with the sidestand switch. Most of those miles have been two-up riding from Alaska to Ushuaia with LOTS of dirt roads thrown in for good measure.
Orange 800xc ABS travelling around the world. Currently in Argentina. www.tiger800rtw.com or https://www.facebook.com/Tiger800RTW/

Offline BurntEnds

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2021, 12:56:17 PM »
*Originally Posted by Newhorizons [+]

*But looking at the side stand switch and its plug. Its also in a pretty dodgy area so just wondering how robust this switch is and if it plays up.... ever ... hello to the Tiger community.
Is it a just a matter of creating that circuit by joining the 2 wires ??? If so will have emergency bits in my spares kit.

Fwiw, I had a problem with the micro switch on the clutch perch!!
Pulled it apart and noticed that the housing was flexing and not open/shut properly. The result of that was that it would not start in gear and it can effect other function. So put some very small cable ties around the casing to stop flex and then put some silicon into its mount area so that it was secure. PITA if it accidentally stalls in traffic ...

So at the end of the day there is so much wiring running around in there there any small connection problems would be days pulling things down and going through the basics. So fingers crossed all that all my anal wiring work pays off haha.

I have a 2013 roadie. Have put it though lots of sugary soft sand, taken it off across rocky desert roads, hit rocks with it, dropped it, ridden in rain and snow. Never an issue with the side stand switch. However, I have had issues with the clutch switch. But only after I changed to a shorter ali express clutch lever. I disliked the lever and went back to stock and still had clutch switch issues. I don't recall how I sorted that, but I think I just cleaned it up and adjusted the cable. No issues now with that.

Offline BurntEnds

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2021, 09:39:43 PM »
Happened upon another thread on a different forum. Someone was asking about this. I haven't really read too much about people having issues with their Tiger, but I have seen quite a few Tenere 700 vids where the whole mess was thrashed due to an unfortunate design.

Regardless, here were two recommendations.

1. https://www.britishlegends.fr/en/stand-removal-triumph.html

Side stand bypass plug. 20.

2. Zip tie a bit of rubber to the switch to keep the plunger depressed entirely. This is less about durability and more about bypassing it. The first option above seems like it would be more fault tolerant should there be damage to the plunger itself as that bypasses it entirely.

Offline chuckxc

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2021, 10:46:56 PM »
It's not an issue with this bike. Just maintain you bike properly.
The side stand switch and clutch switch are there as an interlock for a very good safety reason. And if you've ever been on a bike which takes off in gear with the side stand down you'll understand. Or hit the starter button with the bike gearing engaged.

Laterally unstable unless moving.

My third Triple - 1976 Laverda 3CL Jota
My 4cyl grunt - 2005 Honda CB1300F

Online K1W1

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Re: How durable is the switch for the side stand ?
« Reply #19 on: November 21, 2021, 05:00:03 AM »
Pick the forum for any make or model of motorcycle you can think of and provided the bike was manufactured after the mid 1970s there will be somebody somewhere on it talking about a side stand switch issue.
As Chuck says I would rather have it working than disable it the be responsible on the day when some person maybe even me starts the bike in gear.

 


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