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Offline craggsy

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12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« on: September 21, 2021, 11:54:31 AM »
Hi, I have a 12v battery pack for my heated vest. It also has a 5v use.
I obviously charge it via the adaptor at home, but I was wondering if it is possible to charge it from the bike when traveling/camping? Directly from the battery or via the socket?
You can get these packs with various amps. They obviously put out 12v themselves like the bike/ battery, but should be no different from a battery charger or trickle charge (i think?) except Id want the charge the other way.
Does anyone do this safely?
Im not into watts, volts, ohms, amps stuff, but Im sure someone will understand the risks.
I assume direct to the battery would pose no risk to rectifier, alt electrics etc.
And the battery is a hell of a lot bigger than the pack.

Online K1W1

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2021, 12:54:14 PM »
If it charges via a USB at home it should charge fine on the bike.

Offline chuckxc

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2021, 01:46:13 PM »
I assume this is the battery that came with your heated vest and is used specifically for that purpose but also has the additional feature to provide 5V charging of other devices.
You need to look on the home charging device that is used to charge the battery and find out what the output voltage is on that device. If it is around 13 to 14V DC then you can ask use your Tiger accessory plug as a charging source.
Alternatively, what I do is run my 12V vest directly off the motorcycle without using any vest battery.
Laterally unstable unless moving.

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Offline craggsy

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2021, 04:52:19 PM »
The pack is not charged by the USB, its a 12v input via an adaptor plugged into the mains.
 
Like the 2nd reply I use my heated vest directly frm the bike, but the scenario I am thinking about is 3 nights camping.
1st cold night in the tent use my heated to keep warm using the battery pack.
For the 2nd and subsequent nights  I need to charge the pack up.
I assume I can charge it from the bike when riding during the day.

The input from the mains is 12v so from what you say it should be ok attached to the battery.

I like to keep toasty when camping in the UK.

Offline pme

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2021, 05:49:39 PM »
Most likely a lithium chemistry 3 cell unit with a usb power outlet module.
If the mains adaptor simply provides 12volts dc then you should have no problem charging from the 12volt outlets on your bike. If the adaptor provides current limited charging then I would suggest you can not.
Maybe email the makers and ask? (good luck if they are chinese)
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Online K1W1

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2021, 10:29:41 PM »
 A new sleeping bag would be a better long term investment that trying to rely on a powered heater that may or may not have power available.

Offline craggsy

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2021, 10:22:22 PM »
*Originally Posted by K1W1 [+]
A new sleeping bag would be a better long term investment that trying to rely on a powered heater that may or may not have power available.

 
  :047: Yes, I have one of those, but it could be better.
But my heated waist coat, when not in the bag, is better than taking the Wife  :001:
Im getting soft in my old age.

Offline healdem

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Re: 12v Battery pack charging on bike?
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2021, 11:11:24 AM »
Technically if the charge for the OEM battery is at 12v, then the 12v (well ~14.4v) from the engine running shoudl be fine.

BUT its mentioned its a lithium battery of some type. Lithium batteries can be very sensitive to charging, either durtion or type. even a standard lead acid battery will struggle if over charged, usually boiling off the electroylte if its overcharged. Some lithoum chemistries require specific chargiong profiles..

I guess it depends on what the chargine pathway is. if the mains connection is 'merely' a 12v source you are golden. read the label. a giveawy would be if the 12v source was a 2 pin connection. that would probably mean the charging sense circuitry will be in the battery cradle or battery itself.

having seen the results of a few lithium cells that went feral  and exploded or caught fire im very wary just winging it.

The 'safest' option may be to run a DC to AC inverter and charge using the manufactuers provided connnection. inverters can be quite cheap, but whether you have sufficient spare power on the bike to run an inverter to run a charger is a different matter. Alternartivley try and find out how quickly the battery re charges and plan stop(s) of a suitable duration to top up the battey connected to mains power when having a brew stop or say a post ride stop over

personally I think you have to either harden up
OR mebbe get a better quality sleeping bag. the seasonal grading does make a difference. you may need to spend quite a bit more to get a compact winter (-10C..-20C) rated bag
OR re think the time of year you are camping
OR make certain the antifreeze in you blood is at the correct level BEFORE going to bed.  :492:


 


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