Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] Shims  (Read 1104 times)

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  • Offline DonSimon

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    Offline DonSimon

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    • Bike/Model: '93 Trophy 900
    Shims
    on: Dec 04, 2023, 06.00 pm
    Dec 04, 2023, 06.00 pm
    Does anyone know FOR A FACT what diameter shims are correct for my 2012 Tiger 800 (VIN less than 674841)?

    I've had various suggestions ranging from 9mm to 25mm. My mecanico here is going to do me a valve job but wants to source parts before disassembly (and I can't afford the Triumph official shim set!).

    While writing, any recommendations for other parts worth changing at same time?

    Thanks,
    DonSimon
    Mexico
    Don Simon, San Antonio TX  '93 Trophy 900 / Tiger 800 '12

  • Offline chuckxc   au

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    Offline chuckxc

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    Re: Shims
    Reply #1 on: Dec 04, 2023, 07.26 pm
    Dec 04, 2023, 07.26 pm
    7.48mm

    *Originally Posted by whereisbobl [+]
    Checked valve lash last week.   12,100 miles on Odo.

    Intake were perfect, exhaust were right at the bottom of the range.   I did not have the right shims so buttoned it back up and will bring to mid-range next time I get a chance.

    BTW, Shims are of the 7.48 diameter variety.

    Job was not difficult, just follow the manual.   The only quirky part is that once the cam shafts are in, and before tightening up the camshaft ladder (hold down mont) you really want to put tension on the cam-chain.   The book mentions putting tension on it, just not during the early part of the buttoning up phase.   If you don't put tension on it, the chain "can" sorta bunch up between the cam gears at top requiring you to pull the camshaft ladder again.   Other than that, the manual is excellent.   Oh, and you really want narrower feeler gauges as the exhaust shims are tough to get to and the thick feeler gauges (.325 to .375 mm) don't bend very well if they are of the 1/2 wide variety.   Even bent they are a pain to get a good reading.   I picked up some 1/4 inch wide ones and they work great.
    Laterally unstable unless moving.

    My third Triple - 1976 Laverda 3CL Jota
    My 4cyl grunt - 2005 Honda CB1300F

  • Offline pme   gb

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    Offline pme

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    Re: Shims
    Reply #2 on: Dec 06, 2023, 09.22 am
    Dec 06, 2023, 09.22 am
    Also DRZ400sm for forest tracks, previous bikes:- Honda SS50, BSA 250SS80, Yamaha RD125, Yamaha TY250, Honda CBR600, Honda Africa Twin XRV750, Kawasaki KMX200, Kawasaki KDX200, Kawasaki KLX250 Yamaha WR200

  • Offline Chippy4467   gb

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    Offline Chippy4467

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    Re: Shims
    Reply #3 on: Dec 06, 2023, 07.46 pm
    Dec 06, 2023, 07.46 pm
    Not sure I would want to source before opening up the engine (unless supply is very slow) as by measuring gaps and then shims you can often move shims to other valves to get within tolerance and then only end up buying 3 or 4.

  • Offline Tigress1968   au

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    Offline Tigress1968

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    • Bike/Model: 2015 Tiger 800XCX
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    Re: Shims
    Reply #4 on: Dec 06, 2023, 08.40 pm
    Dec 06, 2023, 08.40 pm
    Yes, the shims are 7.48mm in diameter.
    I would wait until you have the shims out and measured before looking for replacements as some may not need replacement and they are readily available.
    You do not necessarily need to source replacement shims from Triumph. Kawasaki use 7.48MM shims in some of their bikes (I also have a Kawasaki 250cc Super Sherpa which uses them). I think some Yamaha's use 7.48mm also.
    Some dealers will swap your old shim for the one you need.
    I purchased an aftermarket shim kit to do my two 7.48mm shimmed bikes for the convenience of having shims in stock at home.
    There are also mail order specialist shim businesses  - we have an excellent one in Australia.
    Another option is to reduce the size of an oversized shim using a flat surface grinding stone (carborundum or diamond grit). I've did this with a Ducati and Laverda years ago with no problems. I've read some online "opinions' about this being risky which do not seem to be based on personal experience. Measure the shim carefully and make sue it is completely clean and there should be no problem.
    Hope this helps

  • Offline Stevie.P   gb

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    Offline Stevie.P

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    Re: Shims
    Reply #5 on: Dec 06, 2023, 08.55 pm
    Dec 06, 2023, 08.55 pm
    *Originally Posted by Chippy4467 [+]
    Not sure I would want to source before opening up the engine (unless supply is very slow) as by measuring gaps and then shims you can often move shims to other valves to get within tolerance and then only end up buying 3 or 4.

    That was my 24k experience. Five were OK and of the other seven, four were corrected from swops of them and the remaining three were purchased from my dealer off the shelf. If I'd bought the indicated kit I'd have paid around 70 extra for shims I'd personally probably never use.

    Also owned my 1979 Bonnie T140E from new!
    We don't stop playing because we grow old .. WE GROW OLD BECAUSE WE STOP PLAYING!!!


     



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