Author [ES] [CA] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Lube your nuts folks  (Read 4323 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline SteveMac

  • Tiger Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 107
  • Bike: BMW R1200S
  • Location: Kent UK
Lube your nuts folks
« on: February 28, 2011, 08:59:09 AM »
I'm sat in a Cafe awaiting my R1200S to be serviced in Bromley, its being done by a great mechanic, Mark Holden..  http://www.mhmotorcycles.co.uk/

We just a conversation about the Tiger and he offered one piece of advice, once I get it home work my way around the bike and remove and coat every bolt and nut in anti-seize.

Theres a few customers Triumphs in the shop today who are in for simple jobs such as forks seals buts hes having to drill out bolt after seized bolt.. he says that Triumphs have an issue with using not the greatest fixings and over time the will bind and you won't get the buggers out.

I know bugger all about Triumphs, this will be my first after years of BMW's and I going to take his advice and get the copper ease out.

« Last Edit: February 28, 2011, 09:01:04 AM by SteveMac »
places I've ridden:
Norway, France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Sweden, Iraq, Kuwait, Ireland.

Best ride, Iraq at night with Cruise Missiles passing by...

Offline GIDEON

  • Tiger Jedi
  • *****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Learn it! Life it! LOVE IT!
  • Bike: Tiger 800 XC
  • Location: South Africa
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2011, 09:09:33 AM »
I will just cause I dont want to have the trouble later, thanks
"Horsepower is an illusory Mathematical equation
 Torque is the source of all Good things in the world"
-Nobody can be exactly like me. Sometimes even I have trouble doing it-

Offline jallen

  • Non-Active
  • Tiger Master
  • *
  • Posts: 339
  • Bike: Tiger 800
  • Location: Luton, England
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2011, 09:33:23 AM »
Yes, but you shouldn't use copper grease on caliper bolts, clamp bolts etc as the torque will be incorrect.

Offline SteveMac

  • Tiger Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 107
  • Bike: BMW R1200S
  • Location: Kent UK
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2011, 09:42:36 AM »
Genuiine Question, I'm not a mechanic I just blow stuff up for a living.

What could you use on these specific areas?

These areas area exactly what he was pointing out to me as the worst to seize and most problematic to resolve. After my service he's got to drill out about 6 bolts all around the forks and stanchions.

before I do anything need to know the correct torque settings.. don't fancy buys the full manual.. anyone have a link?
places I've ridden:
Norway, France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Sweden, Iraq, Kuwait, Ireland.

Best ride, Iraq at night with Cruise Missiles passing by...

Offline t8coco

  • Tiger Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 782
  • Bike: SPEED TRIPLE R
  • Location: sussex
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2011, 09:45:03 AM »
 from past bike's i think the wheel nuts and swing arm pivot are the worst areas i don't think it will be a problem if you use your bike regularly and it gets regular tyre changes as they should be lubed up then. From the factory they are
very tight and not usually greased up as they should be have found this on most bike's not just Triumph
 
Steve

Offline healdem

  • ....has a fluffy tube
  • Premier Member
  • Tiger Jedi
  • *
  • Posts: 4571
  • Bike: 2011 Tiger 800
  • Location: Cheshire
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2011, 10:19:10 AM »
although not for Triumph bikes this shold give a reasonable guide to torque settings
my understanding is that the torque setting shoudkl be the same for a specificed thread and diameter
http://www.finaldrives.eu/PartsBoltTorque.htm
there may well be differences between the materials used for the bolt, nut or thread. ferinstance its possible that an aluminium part may require less torque than a steel part, but I'm no engineer.

http://www.cwfasteners.co.uk/fastenerFAQ.htm gives more bumpf including
Q: How tight should a fastener be? What torque setting is appropriate?

A: This is not a simple question and many factors will affect the torque that should be used. Tightening a fastener to a given torque will usually result in some small amount of stretch to the fastener itself; if this stretch exceeds the tensile strength of the fastener either during the tightening process or subsequently with operational load added, the fastener will fail. The torque is therefore important and many engineering applications will specify the correct torque settings. If these are not respected, failures can result which could easily have safety implications. If you are servicing or building a piece of equipment, especially if it has any safety-related aspect, you should always try to obtain the tightening torque values that were specified by the designer and to follow them carefully.

Considering the general principles, the type, size, thread and grade of the fastener itself naturally all have a significant effect on acceptable torque values (mild steel fasteners could fail with a torque that would be fine with a grade 10.9 fastener; a small bolt will fail way before a large bolt). The surface finish and any lubrication and/or contamination also make a big difference - the tightening torque must overcome the friction between the threads and any lubrication will obviously allow a fastener to be tightened more for a given torque, so critical torque requirements should normally be set with the fasteners clean and with known lubrication. Another often overlooked aspect is the torque requirement of the application itself - just because a bolt can withstand a high tensile load, it doesn't mean that the fitting will not be damaged. The tightening torque should therefore be appropriate not only to the fasteners but also to the strength and materials of the fitting. If a fastener is being used in a gasketed joint, it is important to close the fitting onto the gasket with sufficient pressure to seal the gasket and to withstand any operating pressures. The tightening torque should generally be sufficient to take up any looseness or play in the joint - fasteners are more likely to suffer from fatigue failures if they are subjected to cyclic loading without being tight enough.

There is a handy guide to maximum torque settings for various common fastener sizes on the Volvo Owners' Club web site (this link will open in a new window). Please note that CW Fasteners is not responsible for the content on any external web site and that you have full responsibility for verifying the accuracy of any information you find, especially in any safety-related situation.

Any critical torque should be set with the aid of a good quality (and preferably recently calibrated) torque wrench. CW Fasteners keep a range of torque wrenches in stock.

http://www.volvoclub.org.uk/faq/ImagesSpecialTools/TorqueSpecs.htm

Offline Bert the tigger

  • Non-Active
  • Tiger Jedi
  • *
  • Posts: 1140
  • Location: Kent, England
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2011, 12:25:30 PM »
*Originally Posted by SteveMac [+]
I just blow stuff up for a living.

I want your job :001:
White 800XC ABS A1, the fast colour

Online KildareMan

  • Tiger Jedi
  • *****
  • Posts: 8813
  • Bike: Venom Yellow 800
  • Location: Naas Ireland
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2011, 01:13:22 PM »
*Originally Posted by SteveMac [+]
Genuiine Question, I'm not a mechanic I just blow stuff up for a living.

What could you use on these specific areas?

These areas area exactly what he was pointing out to me as the worst to seize and most problematic to resolve. After my service he's got to drill out about 6 bolts all around the forks and stanchions.

before I do anything need to know the correct torque settings.. don't fancy buys the full manual.. anyone have a link?

Threadlock
Anglo-Chilean Irishman - Lost again

Offline foey

  • Tiger Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 141
  • Location: Ipswich UK
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2011, 02:18:11 PM »
Whilst this is sound advice, not just for Triumph owners but all motorcycle owners, i don't agree with the Triumph use crap bolts stance, just before i bought my 1050 a couple of years ago i read an article in one of the motorcycle glossys where they took bolts from a Triumph Tiger 1050 & from bikes from each of the four Japanese manufacturers & put them together for a period in a salt water spray cabinet, the Triumph ones came out tops for resisting corrosion.

Offline brid tiger

  • Tiger Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 795
  • Jet tiger the best colour.....
  • Bike: tiger 800
  • Location: bridlington
Re: Lube your nuts folks
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2011, 03:59:15 PM »
I think its a common fault on most bikes made now a days and all to save a few pounds .I changed the brake pads in my old trophy last year and the bolts holding the pads in where made of cheese i had to drill them all out and buy new ones , You can allways shift a  bolt with a small explosion with all the c4 you have stolen.... :020:
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 01:09:45 PM by brid tiger »
Based in Bridlington on the East coast of the UK............

 


Recent Topics