Triumph Tiger 800 Forum

Tiger 800 / 900 - Main Discussion Section => General Maintenance and Servicing => Topic started by: pennpeel on February 22, 2021, 07:36:58 PM

Title: more servicing questions
Post by: pennpeel on February 22, 2021, 07:36:58 PM
Hi all quick question about fork oil replacement, while looking at my Haynes manual it mentions Triumph recommend changing the fork oil every four years or every 24k miles.  Are people with Tigers actually following all Triumphs service recommendations?

I ask because when I took my Tiger into an independent bike garages over the last few years. They didn't seem to do anything apart from oil/filter and clean the brakes. Even though I took the service sheet printed off from Triumph.

Am I going over the top?

The same with my Honda the books says change this that and the other, but when it goes into again independent garages they do little if anything suggested. I did the service on my own car this year and changed coolant/ brake fluid sparks plugs as per Hondas service sheets.

Just Curious :)
Title: Re: more servicing questions
Post by: UncleGary on February 22, 2021, 11:01:54 PM
Good question. I changed the fork oil on schedule because the interval coincided with winter months and I was bored. How's that for a technical reason? Was it necessary? I don't know. The fluid looked almost new. I did the service as prescribed.
Title: Re: more servicing questions
Post by: AvgBear on February 23, 2021, 03:47:55 AM
It's called "preventive maintenance" and is probably a belief system - more than anything - for many? It's the opposite of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" (technically: run-to-failure or reactive maintenance).
Desired benefit is relief from nuisance and costs of breakdowns (unplanned maintenance) and a machine in proper fettle.
As to what to do and when to do it?: If you had a fleet of Tiger800s you could develop a preventive maintenance schedule from experience -- in lieu of that, relying on Triumphs or Mr. Haynes is probably the next-best-thing?
As to fork oil: oils oxidize -- wear out with time and use. Most have oxidation inhibitor additive formulas as well as other additives to maintain functionality. But, eventually, ...
Title: Re: more servicing questions
Post by: posty on February 23, 2021, 09:13:27 AM
Yes fork oil does deteriorate over time - it works pretty hard constantly - like engine oil and you wouldnt skimp on that would you?
My local suspension guy recommends changing for oil more regularly than this, but I am a lightweight, usually ride solo and dont ride hard so I guess my oil would last longer?
Horses for courses - its a pity theres not a drain plug as it means removing the forks to drain the oil but I will be doing it.
Title: Re: more servicing questions
Post by: philmcglass on February 23, 2021, 03:26:56 PM
It's not a big job. Most time is taken dismantling the ancillaries before removing fork tubes.
Allow half a day.
Title: Re: more servicing questions
Post by: hawkbox on February 23, 2021, 04:21:04 PM
I ended up going about 60k km on the first fork oil and ended up replacing it cause I got a leak after doing some fairly aggressive (for me) offroading.  The shop used cheap seals I think and I replaced them again the next year, then again the next year cause they just kept leaking.  Last winter I pulled them off and did them myself which turned out to be far easier than expected using OEM seals.

So far no leaks, so that's promising. 

It's not hard to do, but I never noticed a meaningful difference before and after the oil was done any time.
Title: Re: more servicing questions
Post by: AvgBear on February 23, 2021, 05:26:56 PM
*Originally Posted by hawkbox [+]
...I never noticed a meaningful difference before and after the oil was done any time.
If anyone suffers from harsh damping like some did with early Roadies (or, just want to try to change damping characteristics?) -- changing fork oil viscosity is one route.
There's been considerable Forum discussion on this in the past.